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B2S by Samsonite sets up temporary shop for back to school sales

BRANDON — When you think about school supplies, Samsonite probably isn't the first brand name that pops into your mind, but a new store called B2S by Samsonite is hoping to change that.

B2S by Samsonite opened in June at Westfield Brandon and at locations around the country. They'll close in mid September, after school starts.

"It's a new concept for Samsonite," said Samsonite's Brian Singh. "Kids don't necessarily know the Samsonite brand, except through their parents, so we're trying to introduce them to it."

B2S by Samsonite, located across from Books-a-Million in the mall, sells backpacks and duffel bags, plus such accessories as luggage tags and iPad cases. It's all made by Samsonite and all designed primarily for students.

Students will appreciate the styles and variety, Singh said, and parents will appreciate the quality. All Samsonite bags and packs carry a three-year warranty and can be replaced if they're damaged. So students could buy a backpack at the beginning of 10th grade and know they won't have to buy another until they leave for college.

Singh said Samsonite plans to reopen the shop next year, though it may be in a different location, depending on this year's sales and next year's available storefronts.

B2S by Samsonite is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Call (813) 684-4781 or visit samsonite.com.

Nail care for diabetics

If you just want your nails to look pretty, Nails Done Naturally is one of many local businesses you could choose. But if you have diabetes and need expert attention paid to your feet and toenails, the choices are fewer.

At Vaughan Krasovitzky's new salon, "I specialize in dealing with people who have diabetes," Krasovitzky said. "If you have diabetes, a cut on your foot can lead to infection, which can lead to the loss of your toe or even your foot. It's not a good idea for diabetics to cut their own nails. You really shouldn't cut your nails at all. You should file them."

Krasovitzky opened Nails Done Naturally in early July at 911 S Parsons Ave., in the Brandon Business Center at the corner of Lumsden Road. She's planning a grand opening celebration for this month.

The salon has two rooms: a "Man Cave" that has the look of an Irish pub and an "Oasis Room" with a beach ambience designed to be more appealing to women.

There's only one customer in the salon at a time, so the atmosphere is pleasant and serene in both rooms, Krasovitzky said.

She can provide all the service any other nail salon offers, she said, and can even arrange for a licensed massage therapist by appointment.

But she has family members with diabetes, some of whom have developed serious foot problems. She knows how to treat people with diabetes and knows what danger signs to look for and when one of her customers should see a doctor.

"I'll tell someone I won't do their nails if there's a problem with their feet," she said. "I'm not going to risk my integrity, and their feet and toes, for $40."

Nails Done Naturally is open Wednesday through Saturday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. On Monday and Tuesday, Krasovitzky travels to customers' residences by appointment. Call (813) 444-7334.

If you know of something that should be in Everybody's Business, please contact Marty Clear at [email protected]

B2S by Samsonite sets up temporary shop for back to school sales 08/02/12 [Last modified: Thursday, August 2, 2012 4:30am]
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