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JPMorgan Chase to pay $5.1 billion to resolve Fannie, Freddie claims

WASHINGTON — JPMorgan Chase has agreed to pay $5.1 billion to resolve claims that it misled Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac about risky home loans and mortgage securities it sold them before the housing market collapsed.

The Federal Housing Finance Agency, which oversees Fannie and Freddie, announced Friday the settlement with JP­Morgan, the largest U.S. bank. A broader deal with the Justice Department is still being negotiated.

JPMorgan sold $33 billion in mortgage securities to Fannie and Freddie between 2005 and 2007, according to the agency. That was the second-most sold to Fannie and Freddie ahead of the crisis, behind only Bank of America. The securities soured after the housing bubble burst in 2007, losing billions in value.

In a statement Friday, JP­Morgan called the deal with the FHFA "an important step toward a broader resolution of the firm's" mortgage-related matters.

Edward DeMarco, the FHFA's acting director, said the settlement "provides greater certainty in the marketplace and is in line with our responsibility for preserving and conserving Fannie Mae's and Freddie Mac's assets on behalf of taxpayers."

The settlement is the start of what could be the largest penalty the government has extracted from a company for actions related to the financial crisis. The crisis, triggered by vast sales of risky mortgage securities, plunged the economy into the deepest recession since the Great Depression. Last week, JPMorgan reached a tentative agreement with the Justice Department to pay $13 billion over bad loans and mortgage securities the bank sold before the crisis.

The FHFA sued 18 financial institutions in September 2011 over their sales of mortgage securities to Fannie and Freddie. The total price for the securities sold was $196 billion. The government rescued Fannie and Freddie during the financial crisis when both were on the verge of collapse. The companies received taxpayer aid totaling $187 billion. They have since become profitable and repaid $146 billion.

New York-based JPMorgan will pay about $2.74 billion to Freddie and $1.26 billion to Fannie for the securities it sold. The bank is also paying $1.1 billion for home loans it sold to Fannie and Freddie ahead of the crisis.

JPMorgan Chase to pay $5.1 billion to resolve Fannie, Freddie claims 10/25/13 [Last modified: Friday, October 25, 2013 7:39pm]
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