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Rising Tampa Bay business star and former USF point guard Brian Lamb leaves Tampa Bay for Cincinnati

TAMPA – Brian Lamb is leaving Tampa Bay.

Lamb — regional president of Fifth Third Bank, chairman of the University of South Florida board of trustees and a rising star in regional business circles — is taking a new job at his banking company at its headquarters in Cincinnati. On Wednesday he was named chief corporate responsibility and reputation officer. The newly created position elevates Lamb to the bank's "enterprise committee" and makes him one of the dozen most senior policy-setting executives at one of the country's top 25 banking institutions.

Lamb, 40, joined Fifth Third in Tampa in 2006. He will now report to Teresa Tanner, Fifth Third's chief administrative officer.

Tanner, in a statement, said Lamb brings "a high degree of personal passion in serving and collaborating with the community. Brian is an outstanding banker who has produced stellar results for both the bank and the community."

Regional bank presidents who work for larger financial institutions often must move in order to win promotions. A Tampa Bay Times profile of Lamb that appeared early this month raised that potential risk.

A native Floridian and stellar point guard and basketball captain in the mid-1990s for USF, Lamb holds deep ties to USF, the Tampa Bay community and the state. But he told the Times he was loyal to his bank and would likely go — if called — wherever they thought he could best serve.

Read more:From point guard to point man: Rising business star Brian Lamb is out to elevate Tampa Bay's economy

His new job is effective immediately. A Fifth Third spokesman said Lamb, who was at the bank's headquarters on Wednesday, initially will take an apartment near the Cincinnati headquarters to facilitate his taking on new responsibilities in such short order. He is married and has two daughters.

Lamb spent Thursday morning in Board of Trustee meetings at USF, where he said he's committed to serving as chair through his two-year term, USF spokesman Adam Freeman said. The BOT is the only board Lamb plans to stay on, Freeman said.

Along with his accounting and financial background, Lamb brings a broad perspective to banking. Fifth Third's new job may prove a custom fit.

"I am excited to serve Fifth Third in an entirely new capacity and lead a team dedicated to improving the lives of those in our community," Lamb said. "The commitment of the company to its civic and social responsibilities has never been higher, and I am looking forward to delivering strong and positive outcomes for all of our stakeholders."

Lamb was inducted this past spring at the age of 39 into the Tampa Bay Business Hall of Fame. As a sign of solidarity, Fifth Third CEO Greg D. Carmichael attended the event in Tampa.

"Brian is not only a demonstrated civic leader, but also a model of personal integrity and tireless customer focus," Carmichael stated Wednesday. "I could not be more pleased to place Brian in this critical role at a time when industry reputation and community commitment are paramount to our customers and stakeholders."

As regional president, Lamb was responsible for central and north Florida. Now the entire state will be handled by one president, David A. Call, who has been running the bank's South Florida operation from Naples. He is expected to relocate to Tampa in his new role.

Contact Robert Trigaux at [email protected] Follow @venturetampabay.

Rising Tampa Bay business star and former USF point guard Brian Lamb leaves Tampa Bay for Cincinnati 10/27/16 [Last modified: Thursday, October 27, 2016 12:16pm]
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