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Senate panel's report blasts JPMorgan

WASHINGTON — A Senate panel on Thursday issued a scathing assessment of JPMorgan's $6.2 billion trading loss last year. The investigation found that bank executives ignored growing risks and hid losses from investors and federal regulators.

Executives at JPMorgan understated the trading losses to federal examiners by hundreds of millions of dollars and dismissed questions raised about the trading risks, according to the report from the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.

The report suggests that key executives, including CEO Jamie Dimon, were aware of huge losses at the bank, even while they were downplaying the risks publicly. The report also blames federal regulators for lax oversight that allowed the nation's largest bank to pile up risky bets.

On Thursday, JPMorgan acknowledged it made mistakes but rejected any assertions that it concealed losses or risks. A spokesman declined to comment directly on the accusation that Dimon knew of the trading loss in April.

"While we have repeatedly acknowledged mistakes, our senior management acted in good faith and never had any intent to mislead anyone," JPMorgan said in a statement. "We know we have made many mistakes. … We have taken significant steps to remediate these issues and to learn from them."

Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., the subcommittee's chairman, said the inquiry showed "many, many failures" at the bank, some of them "serious and indeed egregious."

The committee will question bank executives and regulators today at a hearing on the trading loss.

Last April, news reports said a trader in JPMorgan's London office known as "the whale" had taken huge risks that were roiling the markets. Dimon immediately dismissed the reports as a "tempest in a teapot" during a conference call with analysts.

But in May, Dimon acknowledged that the bank had lost roughly $2 billion. And during testimony to a separate Senate panel in June, Dimon said the bank showed "bad judgment," was "stupid" and "took far too much risk."

The figure was later revised to more than $6 billion.

JPMorgan executives said publicly that the trades were made for the purpose of hedging against risk. An internal report at the bank blamed traders in the London unit for trying to hide the size of the loss and not keeping bank executives informed.

But the Senate report says executives inaccurately said that the trading decisions were based on a long-term strategy and that the trading positions were fully transparent to regulators. And it says there is evidence that Dimon and other key executives had information last April about the operation's huge and complex portfolio, as well as its losses for three straight months.

The bank "gambled away billions of dollars through risky and exotic trades, then intentionally hid its losses from investors and the public, showing complete disregard for risk management procedures and regulatory oversight," Sen. John McCain of Arizona, the subcommittee's senior Republican, said Thursday.

The Senate report also criticized the oversight of JPMorgan's trading operation by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, a Treasury Department agency. It said the agency failed to investigate the trading even when the London operation several times blew through preset risk limits, failed to notice when the unit didn't submit several required monthly reports, and accepted other reports that omitted key data.

"The OCC takes this matter very seriously. … We are very disappointed that the bank misinformed the OCC, which hampered our supervisory efforts," agency spokesman Bryan Hubbard said Thursday. "We will take additional action as appropriate."

Senate panel's report blasts JPMorgan 03/14/13 [Last modified: Thursday, March 14, 2013 11:17pm]
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