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China meat scandal spreads to Starbucks, Burger King

Customers enjoy their meal near an advertisement claiming to use 100 percent beef at a McDonald's restaurant in Beijing Tuesday, July 22, 2014. China's food safety agency on Tuesday announced a nationwide inspection of processing factories and meat suppliers used by a company accused of selling expired beef and chicken to McDonald's and KFC. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan) XHG102

Customers enjoy their meal near an advertisement claiming to use 100 percent beef at a McDonald's restaurant in Beijing Tuesday, July 22, 2014. China's food safety agency on Tuesday announced a nationwide inspection of processing factories and meat suppliers used by a company accused of selling expired beef and chicken to McDonald's and KFC. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan) XHG102

BEIJING — A suspect meat scandal in China engulfed Starbucks and Burger King on Tuesday and spread to Japan, where McDonald's said the Chinese supplier accused of selling expired beef and chicken had provided 20 percent of the meat for its chicken nuggets.

Chinese authorities expanded their investigation of the meat supplier, Shanghai company Husi Food. A day after Husi's food-processing plant in Shanghai was sealed by the China Food and Drug Administration, the agency said Tuesday that inspectors also will look at its facilities and meat sources in five provinces in central, eastern and southern China.

The scandal surrounding Husi Food, which is owned by OSI Group of Aurora, Ill., has added to a string of safety scares in China over milk, medicines and other goods that have left the public wary of dairies, restaurants and other suppliers.

Starbucks on Tuesday said it removed from its shelves sandwiches made with chicken that originated at Husi. Burger King said it stopped using hamburger it received from a supplier that used product from Husi. Pizza restaurant chain Papa John's announced it stopped using meat from Husi.

In Japan, McDonald's said it stopped selling McNuggets at more than 1,300 outlets that used chicken supplied by Husi. The affected stores are in Tokyo area and the cities of Nagano and Shizuoka.

A Shanghai broadcaster, Dragon TV, reported Sunday that Husi repackaged old beef and chicken and put new expiration dates on them. It said they were sold to McDonald's, KFC and Pizza Hut restaurants.

McDonald's and Yum Brands, which owns KFC and Pizza Hut, said they immediately stopped using meat from Husi.

"If confirmed, the practices outlined in the report are completely unacceptable to McDonald's," the company's Chinese business said in a statement.

Husi, in a statement, said it was "appalled by the report" and would cooperate with the investigation. It promised to share the results with the public.

Food and drug safety is an unusually sensitive issue in China after scandals over the past decade in which infants, hospital patients and others have been killed or sickened by phony or adulterated milk powder, drugs and other goods.

Yum's KFC is China's biggest restaurant chain, with more than 4,000 outlets and plans to open 700 more this year. .

China meat scandal spreads to Starbucks, Burger King 07/22/14 [Last modified: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 6:57pm]
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