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Comics get museum to call their own

COLUMBUS, Ohio — There is a place where Snoopy frolics carefree with the scandalous Yellow Kid, where Pogo the possum philosophizes alongside Calvin and Hobbes. It's a place where Beetle Bailey loafs with Garfield the cat, while Krazy Kat takes another brick to the noggin.

That doesn't even begin to describe everything that's going on behind the walls of the new Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum on the Ohio State University campus, which opened to the public Saturday.

"This is the stuff that makes me drool," says Jim Borgman, the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist who now draws the Zits newspaper comic strip. "I enjoy art of all kinds, but it's as if cartoons were segregated for many years and not allowed into such hallowed halls. And this is kind of a moment of setting things right, I think, giving cartooning its due when it has been in the wings all these years."

Jeremy, the kid from Zits? He's in there, too, since Cincinnati native Borgman donated most of his art and papers to the museum.

The whole thing started with Milton Caniff, the influential comic artist whose beloved Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon adventure strips lived in the nation's funny papers for a half-century. Caniff graduated from Ohio State and loved the place so much that he wanted his original art and other papers to be kept here forever. He handed it all over to the university in 1977. Along with library curator Lucy Shelton Caswell, Caniff then began urging his cartoonist friends to do the same. Two classrooms in the journalism building soon began to fill with the new comics archive.

Today, the museum collection includes more than 300,000 original strips from everybody who's anybody in the newspaper comics world, plus 45,000 books, 29,000 comic books and 2,400 boxes of manuscript material, fan mail and other personal papers from artists. The university says it's the largest collection of cartoon art and artifacts in the world.

The museum has originals from everyone from Richard Outcault — whose Yellow Kid in a 19th century comic strip spawned the term "yellow journalism" — to Charles Schulz (Peanuts), Garry Trudeau's Doonesbury and Chester Gould's Dick Tracy."

It's all been moved to a new 30,000-square-foot home in a high-profile corridor of the sprawling Columbus campus, into a space renamed for Ireland, the former editorial cartoonist for the Columbus Dispatch who was one of the pioneers of the art form. His family donated a big chunk of money for the project.

The new place also has also what's been missing at the museum's two previous campus locations: a large gallery space for permanent and rotating exhibitions of comics and cartoon art that will finally give it the air of a proper museum.

Comics get museum to call their own 11/11/13 [Last modified: Monday, November 11, 2013 10:20pm]
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