Make us your home page
Instagram

Communications firm gets a makeover

Deanne Roberts, left, hired Colleen Chappell in 2002 to eventually take over the Tampa ad/PR business. Now, 30-year-old Roberts Communications has been renamed ChappellRoberts with Chappell as CEO and sole owner. Roberts remains with the company to work on bigger-picture issues.

DAVID DEGNER | Times

Deanne Roberts, left, hired Colleen Chappell in 2002 to eventually take over the Tampa ad/PR business. Now, 30-year-old Roberts Communications has been renamed ChappellRoberts with Chappell as CEO and sole owner. Roberts remains with the company to work on bigger-picture issues.



About 250 people showed up last Wednesday in Ybor City to celebrate the newly named ChappellRoberts communications/public relations firm. The business, formerly known as Roberts Communications, was founded 30 years ago by mover and shaker Deanne Roberts, a rare woman elected to head the Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce, a leader in the "creative communities" effort to blend business and arts as a regional development tool, and one of the founders of the Emerge Tampa movement, a group for young business professionals. Now Colleen Chappell is CEO and sole owner of the newly branded business. Roberts successfully got her hard-earned equity out of her own company and will remain at the company to lead its issues management practice. On Friday, Chappell responded to a few questions about ChappellRoberts' plans.

"We'll continue to emphasize being a strategic partner — not a vendor," she said. "My favorite question to ask our clients is: 'What's keeping you up at night?' If we can help them close a gap in their business plan, we'll build long-term loyalty." But isn't this a nasty economic time to be CEO of any business? Said Chappell: "This is a great opportunity for our clients to gain share of mind, market and wallet. With so many companies pulling back, we are helping clients gain traction in the market now so when it does turn later, they will be far ahead of the competition."

Chappell still calls upon her past results-oriented approach. "My best experience was heading up business sales for Verizon Wireless, where I learned an ad has to do more than look really cool and creative. It needs to sell."

In her new role, Roberts, who battled cervical cancer in the past year, also hopes to sneak in a bit more time in her coastal Maine home.

Communications firm gets a makeover 11/16/08 [Last modified: Tuesday, November 18, 2008 3:53pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. 'Toxic' times: How repeal of Florida's tax on services reverberates, 30 years later

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Long before Hurricane Irma attacked Florida, the state faced a troubled fiscal future that the storm will only make worse.

    Robertson says the tax debate is now “toxic.”
  2. Fewer Tampa Bay homeowners are underwater on their mortgages

    Real Estate

    The percentage of Tampa Bay homeowners underwater on their mortgages continues to drop. In the second quarter of this year, 10.2 percent of borrowers had negative equity compared to nearly 15 percent in the same period a year ago, CoreLogic reported Thursday. Nationally, 5.4 percent of all mortgaged homes were …

    The percentage of Tampa Bay homeowners underwater on their mortgages  continues to drop. [Times file photo]
  3. 'What Happened'? Clinton memoir sold 300,000 copies in first week

    Blogs

    Despite being met with decidedly mixed reviews, What Happened, Hillary Clinton's new memoir about the 2016 presidential campaign, sold a whopping 300,000 copies in its first week.

    The new memoir by former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton sold 300,000 copies in its first week.
  4. After Irma topples tree, home sale may be gone with the wind

    Real Estate

    ST. PETERSBURG — To house hunters searching online, the home for sale in St. Petersburg's Shore Acres neighborhood couldn't have looked more appealing — fully renovated and shaded by the leafy canopy of a magnificent ficus benjamini tree.

    Hurricane Irma's winds recently blew over a large ficus tree, left, in the yard of a home at 3601Alabama Ave NE, right, in Shore Acres which is owned by Brett Schroder who is trying to sell the house.
[SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]

  5. Unemployment claims double in Florida after Hurricane Irma

    Business

    The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits dropped by 23,000 last week to 259,000 as the economic impact of Hurricane Harvey began to fade.

    Homes destroyed by Hurricane Irma on Big Pine Key last week. Hurricane Irma continued to have an impact on the job market in Florida, where unemployment claims more than doubled from the previous week.
[The New York Times file photo]