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Adams leaves Wesley Chapel hospital to take over Florida Hospital Tampa

WESLEY CHAPEL — Brian Adams, who provided the leadership to raise Wesley Chapel's first hospital in 2011, is leaving his post as CEO of Florida Hospital Wesley Chapel to take over the reins of Florida Hospital Tampa.

Adams, 33, will replace John Harding, who is retiring after 26 years of service for Adventist Health System.

"Brian has demonstrated that business success and mission fulfillment can be accomplished effectively together," Don Jernigan, president/CEO of Adventist Health System said in a news release. "I have been so impressed with the path he has laid out at Florida Hospital Wesley Chapel and look forward to seeing that same vision applied to Florida Hospital Tampa."

In January of 2011, Adams was named president/CEO and the first official employee of Florida Hospital Wesley Chapel. He led a team that constructed the 83-bed, $160 million hospital from the ground up, opening in October 2012. Prior to joining Florida Hospital Wesley Chapel, Adams served for five years in various leadership roles at 383-bed Florida Hospital Altamonte including assistant vice president and chief operating officer.

Adams holds an MBA from the University of Central Florida and a BBA from Union College in Lincoln, Neb. He has served with Adventist Health System since 2000. Adams and his wife, Gwendy, have two young sons and live in the Seven Oaks area.

A search has already been launched to find Adams' successor, officials said. Until then, he will also continue to serve in an executive role at Wesley Chapel.

"I am extremely honored to have opened Florida Hospital Wesley Chapel with each and every one of the 650 employees and 300 medical staff members," said Adams, who assumed his new job on Saturday. "While I will miss my day to day interaction with that team, I am excited about leading a major tertiary care center whose services will influence and impact the entire Tampa Bay community."

Adams leaves Wesley Chapel hospital to take over Florida Hospital Tampa 01/31/14 [Last modified: Friday, January 31, 2014 11:21am]
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