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House passes bill that undercuts labor agency's power in Boeing dispute

WASHINGTON — The Republican-dominated House approved a bill Thursday that would undercut the government's labor dispute with Boeing, wading into a case that has angered business groups and become a major political issue in the GOP presidential primary.

The measure, approved on a 238-186 vote, would ban the National Labor Relations Board from ordering any employer to shut down plants or relocate work, even if a company violates labor laws.

While the bill is not expected to get a vote in the Democratic-run Senate, Republicans are trying to keep up pressure on the agency over a move they claim interferes with legitimate business decisions.

"It tells job creators they don't have to fear an activist NLRB reversing important decisions about where to locate a business," said Minnesota Rep. John Kline, chairman of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

GOP lawmakers have vilified the NLRB for filing a complaint in April that alleges Boeing violated labor laws when it opened a new production line for its 787 airplane in South Carolina, a right-to-work state. The board's acting general counsel, Lafe Solomon, says Boeing went to South Carolina to punish union workers in Washington state for past strikes, and he wants the work moved to the West Coast.

Union leaders claim the bill would render toothless the board's ability to enforce labor laws when companies simply eliminate work to get rid of employees who support unions.

"The bill before us guts the very fundamental rights of American workers to fight for better wages and working conditions, and it makes it easier for companies to outsource American jobs overseas," said Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass.

Boeing has denied the allegations, saying it had valid economic reasons to open the plant in Charleston, S.C. The case is pending before an administrative law judge in Seattle and could last years.

While Boeing would benefit from the bill, it issued a statement Thursday saying it was not endorsing any legislation that might affect the NLRB case.

The National Association of Manufacturers praised the GOP vote, saying the NLRB's actions are having "a chilling impact on job creation and causing a great deal of uncertainty for manufacturers throughout the country."

The House vote fell largely along party lines, but eight Democrats from right-to-work states voted for the bill. There are 22 states with right-to-work laws that ban union fees from being a condition of employment.

How they voted

By a 286-183 vote, the House passed a bill Thursday to ban the National Labor Relations Board from ordering any employer to shut down plants or relocate work, even if a company violates labor laws. A "yes" vote was a vote to approve the bill. Here's how Tampa Bay area representatives voted:

Gus Bilirakis,

R-Palm Harbor: Yes

Richard Nugent,

R-Spring Hill: Yes

Dennis Ross,

R-Lakeland: Yes

C.W. Bill Young,

R-Indian Shores: Yes

Vern Buchanan,

R-Sarasota: Yes

Kathy Castor,

D-Tampa: No

House passes bill that undercuts labor agency's power in Boeing dispute 09/15/11 [Last modified: Thursday, September 15, 2011 9:50pm]
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