Thursday, April 19, 2018
Business

Small Business Majority founder sees common goals past ideology

NEW YORK

When John Arensmeyer owned a high-tech company, he didn't think that the organizations that lobbied on behalf of small business really represented him — or many other business owners. • "They put forth a monolithic view of what small business wants," Arensmeyer said. "I felt they were overly partisan and overly ideological and didn't really look pragmatically at what small businesses need. So I felt there was an opportunity and a need for a new voice." • In 2005, Arensmeyer founded Small Business Majority, a group that now has 8,000 business owners nationwide in its network. Like other lobbying groups, Small Business Majority takes positions on issues including tax and regulation. But it doesn't follow the pack. Arensmeyer's group supported President Barack Obama's overhaul of the health care system — a stark contrast to the National Federation of Independent Business, which unsuccessfully argued against the law before the Supreme Court. • Arensmeyer spoke recently with the Associated Press. Here are excerpts, edited for clarity and brevity:

How is Small Business Majority different from other small-business groups?

Most small-business owners are pragmatic, the vast majority. Some are ideological on the right, some are ideological on the left. The fact is, most small-business owners, as I did when I ran my business, get up in the morning and worry about payroll, worry about putting out a good product, worry about their customers, worry about all the bumps in the road. I felt that on many issues, the business organizations took very ideological, sort of blanket positions. For instance, "all government is bad," or "all government regulation is bad."

That's not the way most small-business owners think. Most small-business owners welcome government involvement sometimes, recognize a role for government sometimes, and sometimes they think government has gone too far. You really need to look at things on an issue-by-issue basis. Whether the issue was taxes or regulations, just to blanketly say all taxes are bad or all regulations are bad, I didn't think that was an appropriate way to look at the world. I think it has hindered the ability of those organizations to really work constructively with policymakers on both sides of the aisle to forge solutions.

What did you see in the health care law that made you support it?

The starting point is that the existing system is completely broken, so it's hard to imagine anything worse than the status quo. That's an important starting point because you have to be open to look at a variety of different solutions. We know that cost is the biggest consideration for small businesses. And so we were obviously looking for ways that the law could bring down costs, whether it was something specific for small businesses like tax credits, or the health insurance exchanges, which will enable small businesses to have the same kind of bargaining power as big businesses and offer their employees the same level of choice.

Small businesses pay 18 percent more than big businesses for the same coverage. The exchanges should get pretty close to leveling that because you spread the administrative costs and you provide small businesses with the same negotiating power as big businesses. That's cost containment. Obviously, getting everyone into this system, the so-called individual responsibility provision, that's a cost-containment provision — because right now, we're all paying for people who are using the system and not contributing to it. The provisions in the law that put some kind of control over what the insurance companies can charge versus what they're actually paying for medical care.

All of these pieces as the Affordable Care Act began to be debated were important and we thought collectively, they were a huge step in the right direction.

All in all, we didn't see any downside. The employer responsibility provision (that requires businesses with more than 50 employees to provide health insurance) is so narrow it only affects 4 percent of all businesses, and of the 4 percent, the vast majority are already offering coverage. You have a very narrow swath of people who were affected by that.

. . . Is it as perfect as it should be? Of course not, but it's such a staggeringly large improvement over the status quo. That's why we did support the law.

What is another issue that Small Business Majority has a different stand on?

Another example is clean energy. Clean energy is a huge economic engine for this country, for big and small businesses, and yet the policies that certain groups push seem to be supported only by traditional fossil fuel companies — not even all big businesses, much less any small businesses.

So again, it was an example of groups stating a business position, calling it good for small business, and really only reflecting a narrow segment of the big-business community.

We support the cap-and-trade bill (designed to limit the amount of carbon emissions in the atmosphere). It was designed to put us in a position where there would be incentives to build new clean energy industries, which will have or are having significant benefits for businesses large and small. It's really key to our future global competitiveness as a nation. Small businesses completely get the fact that they're part of the supply chain, that they need to be part of a competitive economy and that clean energy is the key to that. And yet business organizations opposing the cap-and-trade bill and that are now opposing enforcement of environmental regulations by the EPA on a blanket basis are hindering the continued development of our robust, globally competitive clean energy economy in favor of an outdated energy economy which is oil based.

Who would be better for business, Romney or Obama?

We don't take a position on any campaign. We have, generally speaking, been pleased with the Obama administration's focus on some key issues that we think are important for small business, like getting the health care law passed; like having a very robust clean energy focus and an economic plan; like the fact that he is focused on small-business needs with various tax cuts, 18 that he cites, for small business. Generally, I think the Small Business Administration is functioning well today — but the SBA is not the solution for every small-business owner.

To the extent that any candidate is taking a rigid ideological position on things, we don't think that's in the best interest of small business. What we like about the administration the last couple of years is it seems to have had a pragmatic look at issues and was not driven by blanket ideology.

Comments
St. Petersburg police remove disabled adults from ‘deplorable’ assisted living facilities

St. Petersburg police remove disabled adults from ‘deplorable’ assisted living facilities

ST. PETERSBURG — Beef jerky, mayonnaise and Altoids mints were the only edible things in view inside one of the houses. There was no running water. The refrigerator was empty. A bed sat on top of the deteriorating living room floor. Cigarette butts b...
Updated: 4 hours ago
The St. Pete Pier takes another step forward

The St. Pete Pier takes another step forward

ST. PETERSBURG — Development of the city’s long-awaited pier advanced another step Thursday.The City Council approved a $15 million construction contract and additional money to design a waterside restaurant, build a playground and ferret out naming ...
Updated: 7 hours ago
Free rides on PSTA and HART buses to celebrate Earth Day

Free rides on PSTA and HART buses to celebrate Earth Day

Those who use mass transit across the Tampa Bay area can ride for free on Sunday.To celebrate Earth Day, both the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) and the Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority (HART) will be offering free rides on Su...
Updated: 9 hours ago
Here’s your first look at what will be Riverwalk Place, Tampa’s tallest tower

Here’s your first look at what will be Riverwalk Place, Tampa’s tallest tower

TAMPA — Developers on Thursday detailed plans for what they touted as the tallest building on Florida’s west coast, with condominiums priced in six and seven figures and a shimmering glass design they say would stand out in the skylines of New York, ...
Updated: 9 hours ago
Wells Fargo said to be target of $1 billion fine

Wells Fargo said to be target of $1 billion fine

Federal regulators are poised to impose a $1 billion penalty on Wells Fargo for a number of alleged misdeeds, including forcing customers to buy auto insurance policies that they didn’t need, according to people briefed on the regulatory action. The ...
Updated: 9 hours ago
Marriott Edition to bring five-star hotel ambitions to Water Street Tampa

Marriott Edition to bring five-star hotel ambitions to Water Street Tampa

TAMPA — At the Gramercy Park Hotel in New York City, hotelier Ian Schrager transformed a Jazz Age building with its own rich history into a destination offering even more heady experiences — extravagant, edgy and bohemian.In Tampa, Schrager will have...
Updated: 11 hours ago
Tech Data names Rich Hume to take over as CEO

Tech Data names Rich Hume to take over as CEO

CLEARWATER — A longtime IBM executive is becoming the new leader of Tampa Bay’s largest public company. Tech Data on Thursday named Richard "Rich" Hume as its new CEO effective June 6. Hume joined Tech Data two years ago and is currently the chief op...
Updated: 11 hours ago
LA Fitness tones up Hillsborough location

LA Fitness tones up Hillsborough location

When LA Fitness on West Hillsborough Ave. reopens mid-summer, it will have undergone a $5 million renovation and a complete transformation. Closed since November 2017, the 10-year-old facility was completely torn down and is still undergoing construc...
Published: 04/19/18
Kids have fun and gain coding skills at Code Ninja in Westchase

Kids have fun and gain coding skills at Code Ninja in Westchase

A new program that teaches coding to kids is coming to the Tampa Bay area. Code Ninjas is a Houston-based franchise that is opening its first location in Westchase in early May. There are plans for other centers in Carrollwood, South Tampa, New Tampa...
Published: 04/19/18
Graze all day at Armature Works

Graze all day at Armature Works

TAMPA HEIGHTS— Graze 1910 upholds the comfortable and relaxing, yet elegant setting of Armature Works with its "comfort food" offerings and dedication to serving breakfast all day."It’s the way I eat. I graze all day," said owner Raymond "Ray" Menend...
Published: 04/19/18