Make us your home page
Instagram

Leaders celebrate new Johnson & Johnson center — and 500 Tampa jobs

Gov. Rick Scott and Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, center front, joined several hundred employees and guests Wednesday as Johnson & Johnson formally opened its North American Global Services Center in the Hidden River Corporate Park. At the podium, company Vice President Dominic Caruso described Tampa as "a magnet for well-educated millennials." [Jerry Stockfisch   |   Staff]

Gov. Rick Scott and Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, center front, joined several hundred employees and guests Wednesday as Johnson & Johnson formally opened its North American Global Services Center in the Hidden River Corporate Park. At the podium, company Vice President Dominic Caruso described Tampa as "a magnet for well-educated millennials." [Jerry Stockfisch | Staff]

TAMPA — Lauding the city as "a magnet for well-educated millennials," executives from Johnson & Johnson were joined Wednesday by Gov. Rick Scott and Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn in formally opening the company's new North America Global Services Center, which will ultimately employ 500 people by 2020.

"J & J chose Tampa because of the quality of the people here — people with experience in business services. Smart, talented people. People with multilingual capabilities," Erin Champlin, the company's vice president of global services, told hundreds of employees and guests.

The state and the company announced last year that Johnson & Johnson would create jobs averaging at least $75,000 and make a capital investment of $23.5 million into the region. That made the New Brunswick, N.J., company eligible for state and local incentives of up to $6.4 million as it delivers on the promised jobs and wages.

There are already 240 employees at the center, in the Hidden River Corporate Park off E Fletcher Avenue and Interstate 75. J & J has leased the first five floors of six-story Hidden River Corporate Center One. Many of the jobs will be in human resources, accounting, information technology and other back-office jobs.

Dominic Caruso, Johnson & Johnson's executive vice president and chief financial officer, repeated the "millennial magnet" boast Buckhorn first used at the August 2015 announcement of the deal. But the city's cheerleader-in-chief had plenty more to tout.

"This is a place that three out of the last five years has led the state in number of new jobs being created," Buckhorn said. "This is a place that young people are flocking to. Where intellectual capital is coming, wanting to be a part of this. This is that place in America that the best and brightest want to be a part of."

Johnson & Johnson is one of the most recognized brand names in the world. Its consumer health care products include its eponymous baby shampoo and lotion, Band-Aid adhesive bandages, Listerine mouthwash and Tylenol pain reliever.

The move adds to an already significant footprint for the company in Florida. Its Vistakon eye care business is based in Jacksonville and its surgical, consumer and pharmacy businesses are in South Florida, which serves as a hub for Latin America.

"They're going to continue to grow because we're going to continue to make sure we have the right talent, the right taxes, the right regulation, and we're going to continue to make sure J & J wants to add more and more jobs," Scott said.

Leaders celebrate new Johnson & Johnson center — and 500 Tampa jobs 10/19/16 [Last modified: Wednesday, October 19, 2016 6:58pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Florida turns over voter-roll data to Trump election commission

    State Roundup

    Florida provided voter-roll data to President Donald Trump's election fraud commission Friday despite a lawsuit by the ACLU of Florida attempting to prevent the state from providing the information.

    Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, left, and Vice President Mike Pence, right, lead the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, which is seeking voter data from every state.
  2. Wells Fargo charged 800,000 for unnecessary auto insurance, internal report says

    Banking

    Wells Fargo incorrectly charged 800,000 of its auto loan customers for unnecessary auto insurance, according to an internal report obtained by The New York Times. According to the report, about 274,000 of those customers were forced into delinquency on their loans, which resulted in 25,000 repossessions. …

    An internal Wells Fargo report obtained by The New York Times said the bank charged more than 800,000 people for auto insurance they did not need.  | [Los Angeles Times]
  3. Trigaux: Do we all need PhDs to fight scams, frauds and rip-offs?

    Business

    There are days when it feels like our school priorities are all wrong. Literature? Math? Computers? Nah. What everyone really needs to survive in the 21st century is a PhD in fighting the rise of increasingly creative consumer scams, frauds and rip-offs.

    As solar panels become cheaper and more popular, consumer agencies are starting to see a rise in consumer complaints about misleading and deceptive solar offerings. Solar scams are noted in a national report on major consumer complaints issued this week by the Consumer Federation of America and the North American Consumer Protection Investigators. [William Levesque, Times]
  4. Starbucks to close all Teavana locations, including five in Tampa Bay

    Retail

    Local Teavana locations include Tyrone Square in St. Petersburg, International Plaza and Westfield Citrus Park in Tampa, Brandon and Clearwater.

    Starbucks announced Thursday plans to shut down all 379 Teavana stores, citing "underperformance." Starbucks acquired the mall-based tea chain for $620 million in 2012. [ CANDICE CHOI | AP file photo]
  5. Trigaux: Closing Iron Yard coding school hits area tech hard but leaders talk of options

    Business

    The coming shutdown this fall of the Iron Yard software coding school in downtown St. Petersburg — announced this month as part of a national closing of all 15 Iron Yard locations — remains a shocking event to a Tampa Bay technology community that dreams big of becoming a major player in the Southeast if not …

    In better days last fall, friends and family of graduates at The Iron Yard, based in the Station House in downtown St. Petersburg, applaud during "Demo Day" when grads of the coding school show off their skills. Despite the local success and strong job placement by the coding school, The Iron Yard is closing all of its 15 locations across the country this summer. [LARA CERRI   |   Times]