Make us your home page
Instagram

Tampa Bay stuck in last in Southern-city rankings

In the six-city race for economic supremacy, the Tampa Bay region continues to dodder along in last.

So said the regional economic scorecard released Wednesday by the Tampa Bay Partnership, the business marketing arm of the seven counties in and around Tampa.

Job losses and unaffordable housing weigh down Tampa's ranking relative to Atlanta, Charlotte, Dallas, Jacksonville and Raleigh-Durham.

We've lost more jobs the past year — 33,533 — than our competitors. And even after a 30 percent decline in Tampa area housing prices, it still costs too much to live here, relative to local incomes.

"This is like running a race. We're running fast, but they're running faster," Larry Henson, the partnership's business intelligence officer, said in explaining Tampa's decline compared with the other cities.

Henson saw encouraging signs buried among the 25 indicators that constitute a region's business attractiveness. While we've arguably passed through the worst of the housing crisis, places like Atlanta are feeling the pain belatedly.

It now costs more to buy a home in Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham than it does in Tampa. Tampa home prices are $5,000 more than Jacksonville's, but two years ago they were $50,000 apart.

Our highways aren't the worst congested. That dubious distinction belongs to Atlanta and Dallas. We've risen to fourth place in the number of patents issued here, ahead of Atlanta and Jacksonville.

"That's not the greatest story in the world, but at least it gives us a little optimism," Henson said.

This is the sixth scorecard the partnership has compiled since early 2006. On Friday, the marketing group will unveil a three-year strategic plan for the region called A Model for Prosperity.

James Thorner can be reached at jthorner@sptimes.com or (813) 226-3313.

Regional economic scorecard

Tampa BayAtlantaCharlotteDallasJacksonvilleRaleigh
Jobs/

work force
653142
Income/

productivity
365142
Housing644132
Innovation524261
Education346251
Transportation652241
Overall rank643141

Tampa Bay stuck in last in Southern-city rankings 11/19/08 [Last modified: Wednesday, November 26, 2008 4:32pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Tampa Bay is ground-zero for assignment of benefits cases over broken auto glass

    Banking

    When Rachel Thorpe tried to renew her auto insurance last year for her Toyta RAV4, she was stunned to see her monthly premium had nearly doubled to $600. The Sarasota driver was baffled since her only recent claim was over a broken windshield.

    Auto glass lawsuits filed by a third party (through what's known as assignment of benefits) are skyrocketing in Tampa Bay.
[Times file photo]
  2. Siesta Beach tops Dr. Beach's rankings of best locations in America

    Tourism

    Three beaches in Florida made it on a highly coveted list of the top 10 in America this year, ranked by Dr. Stephen Leatherman, a.k.a. "Dr. Beach."

    This May 18, 2017 photo shows Siesta Beach on Siesta Key in Sarasota, Fla. Siesta Beach is No. 1 on the list of best beaches for the summer of 2017 compiled by Stephen Leatherman, also known as Dr. Beach, a professor at Florida International University. [Chris O'Meara | Associated Press]
  3. Brooksville's popular Florida Cracker Kitchen aims at statewide expansion

    Retail

    BROOKSVILLE — Florida Cracker Kitchen's inverted cowboy boot logo — seemingly plastered on every pickup truck in Hernando County — may someday be just as ubiquitous across the state.

    Shrimp and grits is a signature dish at Florida Cracker Kitchen, which plans to open more restaurants in the state.
  4. Alison Barlow named director to spur creative economy, jobs of St. Pete Innovation District

    Economic Development

    After an extensive search, the recently created St. Pete Innovation District now has its first executive director. Alison Barlow on Thursday was named to the position in which she will help recruit and facilitate a designated downtown St. Petersburg area whose assets and members range from USF St. Petersburg, Johns …

    Alison Barlow has been named the first executive director of the recently created St. Pete Innovation District, a designated downtown St. Petersburg area whose assets and members range from USF St. Petersburg, Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital and Poynter Institute to SRI International and the USF College of Marine Science, among many other organizations. Barlow, who most recently served as manager of the Collaborative Labs at St. Petersburg College, starts her new job June 16.[Photo courtesy of LinkedIn]
  5. Trigaux: Amid a record turnout, regional technology group spotlights successes, desire to do more

    Business

    ST. PETERSBURG — They came. They saw. They celebrated Tampa Bay's tech momentum.

    A record turnout event by the Tampa Bay Technology Forum, held May 24 at the Mahaffey Theater in St. Petersburg, featured a panel of area tech executives talking about the challenges encountered during their respective mergers and acquisitions. Show, from left to right, are: Gerard Purcell, senior vice president of global IT integration at Tech Data Corp.; John Kuemmel, chief information officer at Triad Retail Media, and Chris Cate, chief operating officer at Valpak. [Robert Trigaux, Times]