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Progress Energy's top Florida executives to stick around after Duke Energy merger

As Duke Energy and Progress Energy continue to work out the details of their merger, one thing won't change in Florida: the leader of the power company's operations in the Sunshine State.

Vincent Dolan, president and chief executive officer of Progress Energy Florida, will remain at the helm in Florida for the new company.

Dolan's new title with the merged company will be "state president, Florida."

In addition, Michael Lewis, senior vice president for energy delivery for Progress Energy Florida, will retain his position. Lewis' new title will be "senior vice president, Florida delivery operations."

"They are both staying with the new company," Progress Energy spokeswoman Suzanne Grant said Tuesday. "Their work will be very similar to the work they are doing now."

Duke and Progress expect to complete the merger by the end of the year. Shareholders voted in favor of the deal last month. The deal is not expected to face any hurdles that would derail it.

The decision to retain Dolan was largely expected, as Duke and Progress stated when the companies announced the merger in January that the most significant impact on jobs would be in North Carolina, where both companies currently are headquartered.

The 56-year-old Dolan became president and CEO of Progress Energy Florida in 2009, replacing Jeff Lyash, who was promoted to the company's corporate office in North Carolina.

The utilities plan to eliminate positions that do not need duplication, such as in their human resources and legal divisions, Grant said. Some positions also will be cut through attrition.









Progress Energy's top Florida executives to stick around after Duke Energy merger 09/13/11 [Last modified: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 9:41pm]
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