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Gas prices, cars push U.S. retail sales up 0.9 percent, but consumers more cautious about spending

Shoppers carry their purchases from a Target in Chicago in August. Aside from spending on necessities, like food and energy, consumers are being more cautious about what they buy. Electronic store sales, for example, fell in August.

Associated Press

Shoppers carry their purchases from a Target in Chicago in August. Aside from spending on necessities, like food and energy, consumers are being more cautious about what they buy. Electronic store sales, for example, fell in August.

WASHINGTON — U.S. retail sales rose in August from July because consumers paid higher gas prices and bought more cars and trucks. They were more cautious elsewhere, suggesting the weak economy has made many selective about spending.

Retail sales increased a seasonally adjusted 0.9 percent, the Commerce Department said Friday. Gas station sales jumped 5.5 percent, the most in nearly three years and a reflection of sharp price increases. Demand for autos increased 1.7 percent.

Outside those categories, sales rose only 0.1 percent. That's below July's 0.8 percent gain. Sales at general merchandise, clothing and electronic stores fell. Sales at grocery stores, sporting goods stores and online retailers were unchanged.

Gasoline sales are heavily influenced by price, and auto sales represent major purchases. Excluding those categories offers more clarity on consumers' willingness to spend.

"This has to go down as a weak report," said Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics. "Most of the spending in August was on products that households have to buy, such as gasoline, not items they like to buy, such as new TVs."

The retail sales report is the government's first look each month at consumer spending, which drives roughly 70 percent of economic activity. Consumer spending has increased at a slow pace this year. That has dragged on the economy and kept businesses from hiring.

Higher gas costs also drove up consumer prices by the most in three years, the Labor Department said in a separate report. But excluding energy prices, inflation was mild.

Consumer prices rose 0.6 percent in August, the department said. Gas prices increased 9 percent and accounted for 80 percent of the increase. Outside food and energy, prices rose only 0.1 percent.

Overall consumer prices have increased 1.7 percent in past year. That's well below the Federal Reserve's inflation target.

Lower inflation will allow the Fed to stick with programs announced Thursday aimed at lifting the economy. If the Fed were worried that prices are rising too fast, it might have to raise interest rates.

On Thursday, the Federal Reserve said it would purchase $40 billion of mortgage-backed securities a month until the economy and job market show signs of steady improvement. Fed officials also said they would keep short-term interest rates low, even after the acceleration of any economic recovery.

Rising gas prices could make consumers more cautious about spending in the coming months. Gas prices averaged $3.87 a gallon nationwide on Friday, 16 cents higher than a month ago.

Delivery times rise quickly

as iPhone 5 demand soars

Delivery times climbed quickly as Apple Inc. started taking orders for the iPhone 5 on Friday, suggesting strong demand. Apple began taking orders for the phone at 12 a.m. Pacific time. It initially promised delivery by Friday, when the new phone also goes on sale in stores.

Four hours later, the expected delivery time had grown to two weeks, according to Topeka Capital Markets analyst Brian White.

White said the quick rise in the expected delivery time suggested much stronger demand than Apple expected. Last year, one-week delivery of the iPhone 4S was available into the afternoon of the first order day. "Clearly, iPhone 5 fever is in full swing," White said.

By afternoon, only Sprint was still promising delivery by Friday. Verizon Wireless said delivery would take two weeks, and AT&T said it would take "14 to 21 business days."

Gas prices, cars push U.S. retail sales up 0.9 percent, but consumers more cautious about spending 09/14/12 [Last modified: Friday, September 14, 2012 10:26pm]
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