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Google's computers are creating songs

Google has launched a project to use artificial intelligence to create compelling art and music, offering a reminder of how technology is rapidly changing what it means to be a musician, and what makes us distinctly human.

Google's Project Magenta, announced this month, aims to push the state of the art in machine intelligence that's used to generate music and art.

"We don't know what artists and musicians will do with these new tools, but we're excited to find out," Douglas Eck, the project's leader, said in a blog post. "Daguerre and later Eastman didn't imagine what Annie Liebovitz or Richard Avalon would accomplish in photography. Surely Rickenbacker and Gibson didn't have Jimi Hendrix or St. Vincent in mind."

Google has already released a song demonstrating the technology. The song was created with a neural network — a computer system loosely modeled on the human brain — which was fed recordings of a lot of songs. With exposure to tons of examples, the neural network soon begins to realize which note should come next in a sequence. Eventually the neural network learns enough to generate entire songs of its own.

The project has just begun, so the only available tools now are for musicians with machine learning expertise. Google hopes to produce — along with contributors from outside Google — more tools that will be useful to a broad group, including artists with minimal technical expertise.

Efforts to use computers to make music stretch back decades. But experts say what's unique here is the extent of Google's computing power and its decision to share its tools with everyone, which may accelerate innovation.

"It's a potential game-changer because so many academics and developers in companies can get their hands on this library and can start to create songs and see what they can do," said Gil Weinberg, the director of Georgia Tech's center for music technology.

David Cope, a retired professor at the University of California at Santa Cruz and a pioneer in computer generated music, thinks it's inevitable that one day the best composers will use artificial intelligence to aid their work.

"It's going to rampage through the film music industry," Cope said. "It's going to happen just as cars happened and we didn't have the horse and buggy anymore."

The emergence of this technology is also a wake-up call for what makes us really human.

"A lot of the uniqueness that we like to ascribe to ourselves becomes threatened," said George Lewis, a professor of American music at Columbia University. "People have to get the idea out of their head that music comes from great individuals. It doesn't; it comes from communities, it comes from societies. It develops over many years, and computers become a part of societies."

Google's computers are creating songs 06/06/16 [Last modified: Monday, June 6, 2016 7:26pm]
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