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Google's TV interest unsettles Hollywood

LOS ANGELES — Google revolutionized the way people access information. Now it wants to transform how people get entertainment.

The search giant is touting an ambitious new technology, called Google TV, that would marry the Internet with traditional television, enabling viewers to watch TV shows and movies unshackled from the broadcast networks or cable channels on which they air. Users would need to buy a TV or set-top box with Google software that could connect to the Internet, along with a keyboard to type commands. Users could also use their iPhone or Android phone to operate Google TV.

The prospect of Google getting into television frightens many in Hollywood, who worry that Silicon Valley will upend the entertainment industry just like the Internet ravaged the music and newspaper industries.

By bringing the Web directly to the living room TV, entertainment industry executives fear Google TV will encourage consumers to ditch their $70 monthly cable and satellite subscriptions in favor of watching video free via the Internet.

Others believe it will fan piracy because Google refuses to block access to bootleg movies and TV shows.

And, perhaps most troubling to Hollywood, Google doesn't yet know how it will make money via TV — and whether it intends to compensate the content creators.

Google sees its role as harnessing the power of the Internet to improve television viewing. It's an opportunity, company project managers argue, for the movie studios and television networks to use the limitless storage capacity of the Web to make their libraries of programs available whenever someone wants to watch an old episode of All in the Family or classic films such as Breakfast at Tiffany's.

The concept is simple. Google TV uses Google's expertise in search to cull through viewing options — both in the traditional program lineups and through online services such as Hulu, Amazon.com or even a network's own website — and then displays them on the TV set, just as a browser finds information on the Web.

"We're putting a browser in the TV to enable a whole bunch of things that the studios and the networks are already doing today, but in a less disjointed fashion," said Vincent Dureau, Google's head of TV technology.

Lazard Capital Markets media analyst Barton Crockett predicts Internet video will be the biggest thing to happen in the living room since the advent of digital video recorders. Within five years, television sets and set-top boxes that connect to the Web will be commonplace, he said.

The two-man team leading the Google TV effort — Dureau and Rishi Chandra — say they believe technological innovation can make television better and more profitable for everyone.

"We fundamentally believe the advertising mechanisms we have online will improve ad products on television, whether we do it or someone else does it," Chandra said.

Analysts agree: They say that the Internet is coming to television with or without Google and that it's the only medium that can bring with it the long-awaited promise of targeted and interactive advertising.

Google's TV interest unsettles Hollywood 08/18/10 [Last modified: Wednesday, August 18, 2010 11:08pm]
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