Make us your home page
Instagram

Readers' comments on business news

When savings turn to debt July 5

Tiny interest rate bad for retirees

Examining a retirement nest egg for a baby boomer is disheartening. Ten years ago, one could find safe and secure CDs with interest rates between 5 and 7 percent. That was enough of an increase to keep us coping with inflation and spending.

With the Fed keeping interests rates at near zero to stimulate the economy (translation: encourage borrowing), retirees are left with money in the bank that earns near zero interest. So the banks make money, and we do not.

We were brought up to view the stock market as a place to put funds you could afford to lose. Gambling with our funds in our 60s and 70s and older years is hardly wise. There should be a decent interest rate available to older folks, without gambling in the stock market.

I guess we will just watch the purchasing power of our savings dwindle, and then one day the government will have to take care of us!

Not exactly what we want.

Susan Anderson, Holiday

HomePath's road to deals July 6

More rentals lead to lower values

Foreclosed homes are the business of cleaning up the mess the federal government tried to pursue to give everyone a shot at homeownership. The results are the federal HomePath program trying to discount the value of homes to the point they devalue the other homes of the neighboring homeowners.

The bottom line of devaluation is the explosion of rentals, which also add to depressing area home values. Renter homes are never improved by "slum lord owners," and the renters make no effort at appearance or improvements, either. No government agency wants to become the enforcer of community standards related to homeowners, and we all see our home investments lessen.

Allen G. Smith, Dunedin

share your opinions

MAIL: Business News Letters, P.O. Box 1121,

St. Petersburg, FL 33731

FAX: (727) 893-8939

E-MAIL: biznews@

tampabay.com (Please

use the word "Letter" in

the subject field.)

WEB: www.tampabay.com/letters (Choose the

"Business" option.)

share your opinions

MAIL: Business News Letters, P.O. Box 1121,

St. Petersburg, FL 33731

FAX: (727) 893-8939

E-MAIL: biznews@

tampabay.com (Please

use the word "Letter" in

the subject field.)

WEB: www.tampabay.com/letters (Choose the

"Business" option.)

Readers' comments on business news 07/10/14 [Last modified: Friday, July 11, 2014 1:08pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Pinellas licensing board asks Sen. Jack Latvala for $500,000 loan

    Local Government

    The troubled Pinellas County agency that regulates contractors wants Sen. Jack Latvala to help it get a $500,000 lifeline from the state to stay afloat.

    State Sen . Jack Latvala, R- Clearwater, is being asked to help the Pinellas County Construction Licensing Board get $500,000 from the state so it can stay open beyond February.  [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
  2. In advertising, marketing diversity needs a boost in Tampa Bay, nationally

    Business

    TAMPA — Trimeka Benjamin was focused on a career in broadcast journalism when she entered Bethune-Cookman University.

    From left, Swim Digital marketing owner Trimeka Benjamin discusses the broad lack of diversity in advertising and marketing with 22 Squared copywriter Luke Sokolewicz, University of Tampa advertising/PR professor Jennifer Whelihan, Rumbo creative director George Zwierko and Nancy Vaughn of the White Book Agency. The group recently met at The Bunker in Ybor City.
  3. Tampa Club president seeks assessment fee from members

    News

    TAMPA — The president of the Tampa Club said he asked members last month to pay an additional assessment fee to provide "additional revenue." However, Ron Licata said Friday that the downtown business group is not in a dire financial situation.

    Ron Licata, president of the Tampa Club in downtown Tampa. [Tampa Club]
  4. Under Republican health care bill, Florida must make up $7.5 billion

    Markets

    If a Senate bill called the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 becomes law, Florida's government would need to make up about $7.5 billion to maintain its current health care system. The bill, which is one of the Republican Party's long-promised answers to the Affordable Care Act imposes a cap on funding per enrollee …

    Florida would need to cover $7.5 billion to keep its health care program under the Republican-proposed Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017.  [Times file photo]
  5. Amid U.S. real estate buying binge by foreign investors, Florida remains first choice

    Real Estate

    Foreign investment in U.S. residential real estate recently skyrocketed to a new high with nearly half of all foreign sales happening in Florida, California and Texas.

    A National Association of Realtors annual survey found record volume and activity by foreign buyers of U.S. real estate. Florida had the highest foreign investment activity, followed by California and Texas. [National Association of Realtors]