Dow hits another record on October hiring surge

Thomas Ferrigno, left, converses with fellow trader Glenn Kessler on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. Stocks powered higher as investors reacted to the jobs report. Some analysts say it’s time for the Fed to remove its stimulus program.

Associated Press

Thomas Ferrigno, left, converses with fellow trader Glenn Kessler on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. Stocks powered higher as investors reacted to the jobs report. Some analysts say it’s time for the Fed to remove its stimulus program.

NEW YORK — An unexpectedly strong jobs report gave stocks a lift on Friday, pushing the Dow Jones Industrial Average back to an all-time high.

The gains were led by banks, such as Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase, which stand to benefit from a pickup in lending as the economy strengthens. Consumer-focused stocks such as Priceline.com and Disney also rose after reporting higher profits.

The government reported that U.S. employers added 204,000 jobs in October, an unexpected burst of hiring during a month in which the federal government was partially shut down for 16 days. The job additions were far greater than the 130,000 economists were expecting, according to FactSet, a financial data provider.

The jobs survey left investors grappling with how to interpret this week's surprisingly strong economic data and what it means for the Federal Reserve's economic stimulus program. On Thursday, the government reported that U.S. economic growth accelerated in the third quarter. The Fed's stimulus has helped power this year's stock rally.

"We're walking a tight wire with the Fed," said Rob Lutts, chief investment officer at Cabot Money Management. Lutts said the jobs survey was positive because it showed the economy was improving, but perhaps not strongly enough to assure that Fed policymakers will pull back on its bond-buying program before the end of year.

The Dow gained 167.80 points, or 1.1 percent, to 15,761.78. The Dow also closed at a record high Wednesday. The Standard & Poor's 500 index ended 23.46 higher, or 1.3 percent, at 1,770.61, just a point below its record. The Nasdaq composite rose 61.90 points, or 1.6 percent, to 3,919.23.

Both the Dow and the S&P 500 recovered all of their losses from Thursday, when concern about the Fed withdrawing its stimulus outweighed optimism about faster economic growth.

The jobs report was the second piece of unexpectedly robust economic news that Wall Street received in the past two days. The Commerce Department said Thursday that the U.S. economy grew at a 2.8 percent annualized rate in the third quarter, better than the 2.5 percent rate economists were looking for.

The Federal Reserve has been buying $85 billion worth of bonds each month since December to keep long-term interest rates low and encourage hiring and borrowing. The program has also helped drive up stock prices by making bonds look expensive by comparison.

Some analysts say the impact of the Fed's stimulus on the stock market's rise has been overstated, compared to factors such as rising corporate earnings. Removing the stimulus would likely benefit the economy by eliminating one of the uncertainties facing U.S. businesses, said Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab.

"It's time we rip the Band-Aid off," Sonders said. "If it's the data that supports it, all the better."

Twitter hits turbulence

After surging 73 percent Thursday in its debut on the New York Stock Exchange, Twitter's stock lost some altitude Friday, sliding more than 7 percent to close at $41.65 on its second trading day. Such volatile trading is common for freshly public stocks as investors make decisions with limited insight into how well companies will do in the long run. The shares are still up 60 percent from the $26 IPO price Twitter and the IPO's underwriting bankers set Wednesday night. Twitter made $1.8 billion in the offering.

Dow hits another record on October hiring surge 11/08/13 [Last modified: Friday, November 8, 2013 8:39pm]

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