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2146733 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2013-10-11 19:49:36.0 UTC 2013-10-11T15:49:36.000-04:00 politifact-rep-dennis-ross-says-us-spending-has-fallen-two-straight-years published 2013-10-11 19:48:43.0 UTC 2013-10-11T15:48:43.000-04:00 news/business/markets DTI 112694225 The statement "For the first time since the Korean War, total federal spending has gone down for two years in a row." U.S. Rep. Dennis Ross, in a Tampa Bay Times op-ed The ruling U.S. Rep. Dennis Ross, R-Lakeland, is one of a small group of Republicans calling for an end to the government shutdown. After all, Republicans have succeeded in reining in government spending, Ross wrote in an op-ed in the Tampa Bay Times on Oct. 7. "In the few years since I was elected to Congress in 2010, we have achieved huge savings and taken monumental steps. For the first time since the Korean War, total federal spending has gone down for two years in a row," Ross wrote. "That is why I would support a continuing resolution that funds the government at sequestration levels for one year." A reader asked us whether Ross was correct that, "for the first time since the Korean War, total federal spending has gone down for two years in a row." We thought the claim was interesting, and we decided to check it out. By the most basic measure we found that Ross is right. The Korean War was an active conflict through the signing of a truce on July 26, 1953, so we counted starting in 1953. Between 1953 and 1955, federal spending fell each year, from $76.1 billion to $70.9 billion to $68.4 billion, according to the Office of Management and Budget. By 1956, spending had edged up again, to $70.6 billion. After that, spending almost always went up every year, at least until recently. It fell for one year between 1964 and 1965, and then once again between 2009 and 2010. But the only time it fell two years in a row was between 2011 and 2013. In 2011, federal outlays were $3.6 trillion. Outlays fell to $3.54 trillion in 2012, and the Congressional Budget Office projects the figure to fall to $3.46 trillion in 2013. We should note that this is not the only way to measure a claim like this. Sometimes, raw dollars aren't an especially useful measurement for analyzing long periods of history, especially when talking about things that are growing. Inflation, population growth and economic expansion almost inevitably make the most recent year the largest ever. However, in this case, we think that using raw dollars is an acceptable measurement. That's because reductions in spending mean swimming against the tide of inflation and growth. We rate the statement True. Louis Jacobson, Times staff writer. Edited for print. Read the full version at PolitiFact.com. By Louis Jacobson, Times Staff Writer News, Business, Markets, breaking-news, top business PolitiFact: Rep. Dennis Ross says U.S. spending has fallen two straight years for first time since Korean War ASHAROCKMANN 4STD Main Ross is right about spending falling for two straight years <a href="http://www.politifact.com/florida"><img src="/universal/politifact/images/PolitiFactFlaLogo022810.gif" alt="PolitiFact Florida | Tampa Bay Times" width="349" height="81" border="0" /></a><br/>Sorting out the truth in state politics 2 pfa_ross101313 Ross is right about spending falling for two straight years 2013-10-13 04:00:00.0 UTC 2013-10-13T00:00:00.000-04:00 false templatedata/tampabaytimes/StaffArticle/data/2013/10/11/112694225-politifact-rep-dennis-ross-says-us-spending-has-fallen-two-straight-years StaffArticle news,businessBusiness Newsnews,business,marketsMarketsThe statement"For the first time since the Korean War, total federal spending has gone down for two years in a row."News, Business, Markets, breaking-news, top businessNews, Business, Markets, breaking-news, top businessLouis Jacobson 2133161 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2013-07-25 17:28:22.0 UTC 2013-07-25T13:28:22.000-04:00 louis-jacobson published Louis Jacobson <p>Louis Jacobson is the senior correspondent for PolitiFact and a staff writer for the <i>Tampa Bay Times</i>. He has served as deputy editor of <i>Roll Call </i>and as founding editor of its legislative wire service, <i>CongressNow</i>. Earlier, he spent more than a decade covering politics, policy and lobbying for <i>National Journal</i> magazine. Since 2002, he has handicapped political races, including state legislatures, governors, congressional seats, state attorneys general and the electoral college, currently for <i>Governing</i>. He is senior author of <i>The Almanac of American Politics 2016 </i>and also contributed to the 2000 and 2004 editions. In 2004, Jacobson originated the "Out There" column on politics in the states, which ran in<i> Roll Call</i> and later in Stateline.org and which won five annual awards from Capitolbeat, the association of state capitol reporters and editors. He received the Weidenbaum Center Award for Evidence-Based Journalism from Washington University in St. Louis in 2014.</p> PolitiFact Senior Correspondent writers DTI 109715157 Louis Jacobson is the senior correspondent for PolitiFact and a staff writer for the Tampa Bay Times. He has served as deputy editor of Roll Call and as founding editor of its legislative wire service, CongressNow. Earlier, he spent more than a decade covering politics, policy and lobbying for National Journal magazine. Since 2002, he has handicapped political races, including state legislatures, governors, congressional seats, state attorneys general and the electoral college, currently for Governing. He is senior author of The Almanac of American Politics 2016 and also contributed to the 2000 and 2004 editions. In 2004, Jacobson originated the "Out There" column on politics in the states, which ran in Roll Call and later in Stateline.org and which won five annual awards from Capitolbeat, the association of state capitol reporters and editors. He received the Weidenbaum Center Award for Evidence-Based Journalism from Washington University in St. Louis in 2014. <p>Phone: (202) 463-0576</p><p>The Jacobson file: <a href="http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/staff/louis-jacobson/">PolitiFact.com</a></p><p>E-mail: <a href="mailto:ljacobson@tampabay.com ">ljacobson@tampabay.com</a> </p> 1 /resources/images/dti/2013/07/Louis_Jacobson_wp_11193011.jpg true templatedata/tampabaytimes/AuthorProfile/data/109715157-louis-jacobson AuthorProfile <span style="display:none;" class="author vcard"><span class="fn">LOUIS JACOBSON</span></span><span style="display:none;" class="source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">Tampa Bay Times</span></span><a rel="item-license" href="/universal/user_agreement.shtml">&#169; 2016 Tampa Bay Times</a><br /><br />Times Staff Writer 2265493 2016-02-16 00:34:03.0 UTC 6 Months Ago us-approves-first-factory-in-cuba-since-revolution news/business/economicdevelopment U.S. approves first factory in Cuba since revolution StaffArticle 2282175 2016-06-17 22:07:02.0 UTC 2 Months Ago politifact-why-is-us-labor-force-participation-rate-near-40-year-low news/business/workinglife PolitiFact: Why is U.S. labor force participation rate near 40-year low? StaffArticle 2279292 2016-05-27 20:45:22.0 UTC 3 Months Ago politifact-trump-has-indeed-paid-taxes-contrary-to-clintons-contention news/business PolitiFact: Trump has indeed paid taxes, contrary to Clinton's contention StaffArticle <p><b>The statement</b></p> <p>&quot;For the first time since the Korean War, total federal spending has gone down for two years in a row.&quot;</p> <p><b>U.S. Rep. Dennis Ross</b>, in a <i>Tampa Bay Times </i>op-ed</p> <p><b>The ruling</b></p> <p>U.S. Rep. Dennis Ross, R-Lakeland, is one of a small group of Republicans calling for an end to the government shutdown.</p> <p>After all, Republicans have succeeded in reining in government spending, Ross wrote in an op-ed in the <i>Tampa Bay Times</i> on Oct. 7.</p> <p>&quot;In the few years since I was elected to Congress in 2010, we have achieved huge savings and taken monumental steps. For the first time since the Korean War, total federal spending has gone down for two years in a row,&quot; Ross wrote. &quot;That is why I would support a continuing resolution that funds the government at sequestration levels for one year.&quot;</p> <p>A reader asked us whether Ross was correct that, &quot;for the first time since the Korean War, total federal spending has gone down for two years in a row.&quot; We thought the claim was interesting, and we decided to check it out.</p> <p>By the most basic measure we found that Ross is right.</p> <p>The Korean War was an active conflict through the signing of a truce on July 26, 1953, so we counted starting in 1953.</p> <p>Between 1953 and 1955, federal spending fell each year, from $76.1 billion to $70.9 billion to $68.4 billion, according to the Office of Management and Budget. By 1956, spending had edged up again, to $70.6 billion.</p> <p>After that, spending almost always went up every year, at least until recently. It fell for one year between 1964 and 1965, and then once again between 2009 and 2010.</p> <p>But the only time it fell two years in a row was between 2011 and 2013. In 2011, federal outlays were $3.6 trillion. Outlays fell to $3.54 trillion in 2012, and the Congressional Budget Office projects the figure to fall to $3.46 trillion in 2013.</p> <p>We should note that this is not the only way to measure a claim like this. Sometimes, raw dollars aren't an especially useful measurement for analyzing long periods of history, especially when talking about things that are growing. Inflation, population growth and economic expansion almost inevitably make the most recent year the largest ever. However, in this case, we think that using raw dollars is an acceptable measurement. That's because reductions in spending mean swimming against the tide of inflation and growth.</p> <p>We rate the statement True.</p> <p><i>Louis Jacobson, Times s</i>taff writer. Edited for print. Read the full version at PolitiFact.com.</p>trueruntime2016-08-30 05:57:25