Make us your home page
Instagram

Yellen: Fed monitoring recent weaker economic data

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies Thursday on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Banking Committee to deliver a semiannual  report.

Associated Press

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen testifies Thursday on Capitol Hill in Washington before the Senate Banking Committee to deliver a semiannual report.

WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen noted Thursday that recent economic data have pointed to weaker-than-expected gains in consumer spending and job growth. She said the Fed will be watching to see whether the slowdown proves only a temporary blip caused by severe winter weather.

"We have seen quite a bit of soft data over the last month or six weeks," Yellen said, citing job growth, housing, retail sales and industrial production.

She said the Fed needs to "get a firmer handle on exactly how much of that set of soft data can be explained by weather and what portion, if any, is due to a softer outlook."

In her remarks to the Senate Banking Committee, Yellen repeated the Fed's previous assurances that its pullback in its bond purchases is "not on a preset course" and could be modified if there was a "significant change" in the Fed's outlook. The Fed is gradually reducing its monthly bond purchases, which have been intended to keep long-term loan rates low to encourage spending and growth.

Yellen said that while she was open to adjusting the pace of the Fed's reductions in bond purchases, "I wouldn't want to jump to conclusions" that such a change will be needed.

In prepared testimony she gave two weeks ago to a House committee and on Thursday to the Senate panel, Yellen said the job market's recovery is "far from complete" and that she expects Fed policies to favor low interest rates "for quite some time."

Most economists say they expect the Fed to stick to steady reductions in bond purchases unless the economy significantly weakens in coming months.

"The market is hopeful that they can count on her not to be too aggressive in tapering bond purchases," said David Jones, chief economist at DMJ Advisors. "But in essence, she said she was not going to deviate from the policy course that has been set in terms of reductions in bond purchases."

Yellen's appearance Thursday completed her first twice-a-year report to Congress since becoming Fed chair this month. Her Senate appearance had been postponed by a snowstorm that shut federal offices in Washington on Feb. 13.

In both her House and Senate appearances, Yellen sought to emphasize policy continuity with her predecessor, Ben Bernanke, who stepped down last month after eight years as chairman. Yellen said that she, like Bernanke, believes the economy is strengthening enough for the Fed to gradually scale back its bond purchases.

The Fed has cut the pace of its purchases at both its most recent meetings. It reduced the original $85 billion monthly pace in December and again in January in $10 billion steps to a current level of $65 billion.

Many economists think that as long as the economy keeps improving, the Fed will keep cutting the bond purchases by $10 billion at each meeting this year until ending the program in December.

The Fed has stressed that it's standing by a plan to keep a key short-term rate at a record low near zero for an extended period.

At the past two meetings, it has said short-term rates will likely remain low "well past" the time unemployment drops below 6.5 percent. The unemployment rate is now 6.6 percent.

The Fed has held its benchmark for short-term rates near zero since December 2008.

Yellen: Fed monitoring recent weaker economic data 02/27/14 [Last modified: Thursday, February 27, 2014 7:59pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. SeaWorld shares drop Monday to 2017 low after disclosure of federal subpoena

    Tourism

    The Orlando parent company of SeaWorld and Busch Gardens theme parks saw its stock drop 3.5 percent Monday to $15.10, its lowest price of this year.

    Killer whales perform at Shamu Stadium at SeaWorld in Orlando in 2011, before public pressure was placed on the theme park company to curtail its orca shows.SeaWorld has since announced an end to the traditional killer whale entertainment  at its theme parks. [AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack]
  2. Rick Scott appoints 'my friend,' Jimmy Patronis, as Florida CFO

    State Roundup
    Rick Scott appoints Jimmy Patronis (background) as CFO. [STEVE BOUSQUET | Tampa Bay Times]
  3. Local gas prices plummet as Fourth of July holiday travel approaches

    Tourism

    TAMPA — Local gas prices are enjoying an unseasonal dip around the $2 mark just in time for the hectic Fourth of July holiday travel weekend.

    The price of regular unleaded gasoline has dropped to $1.99 at a Rally station on Pasadena Ave. South and Gulfport Boulevard South, South Pasadena.
[SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]

  4. Air bag recalls, lawsuits lead Takata to file for bankruptcy

    Autos

    Shattered by recall costs and lawsuits, Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. filed Monday for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., saying it was the only way it could keep on supplying replacements for faulty air bag inflators linked to the deaths of at least 16 people.

    Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. CEO Shigehisa Takada bows during a press conference in Tokyo on Monday. Takata has filed for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., overwhelmed by lawsuits and recall costs related to its production of defective air bag inflators.
[(AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi]
  5. Airbag maker Takata bankruptcy filing expected in Japan, U.S.

    Corporate

    DETROIT — Japanese airbag maker Takata Corp. has filed for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., overwhelmed by lawsuits and recall costs related to its production of faulty air bag inflators.