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Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer has unveiled the OneOrlando Fund following Pulse nightclub shooting

The city of Orlando has established its own fundraising campaign, called the OneOrlando Fund, for the victims of Sunday's deadly shooting at Pulse nightclub, Mayor Buddy Dyer announced Tuesday.

"The purpose of the Fund is to provide a way to help respond to the needs of our community, now and in the time to come, after the effects of the Pulse tragedy," according to the new website, OneOrlando.org.

At the time of the announcement, the fund already listed $1.75 million in donations from the Walt Disney Company, the Orlando Magic, JetBlue and Orlando's Mears Transportation.

The fund may also be designated for "LGBTQ, Hispanic, faith and other affected communities, underlying causes of this tragic event, (and) other needs we can not anticipate until we face them," the mayor wrote.

OneOrlando is under the umbrella of Strengthen Orlando, Inc., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation. The Central Florida Foundation will distribute the funds to victims and families.

To make a contribution or for more information, visit OneOrlando.org. Donors may also write a check for the OneOrlando Fund and mail it to OneOrlando, P.O. Box 4990, Orlando, FL 32802-4990. Contact info@oneorlando.org for wire transfers.

Contact Alli Knothe at aknothe@tampabay.com. Follow @KnotheA.

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer has unveiled the OneOrlando Fund following Pulse nightclub shooting 06/14/16 [Last modified: Tuesday, June 14, 2016 9:51pm]
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