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Can't buy me love: Study finds that savers are sexy

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Two researchers at the University of Michigan have done work that "sheds light on how a fundamental consumption behavior (spending and saving decisions) influences the formation of romantic relationships." • "The desire to attract a romantic partner often stimulates conspicuous consumption, but we find that people who chronically save are more romantically attractive than people who chronically spend," wrote Jenny G. Olson and Scott Rick in their paper, "A Penny Saved is a Partner Earned: The Romantic Appeal of Savers." • Yeah baby.

"In the economically uncertain postrecession era, many surveys and studies have shown that being responsible with money — perhaps even to the point that you might be considered cheap — bodes well for your love life," wrote Brad Tuttle of Time magazine.

When the authors ran an experiment in which participants had to evaluate dating profiles, savers were deemed the better catches, reported Chris Taylor of Reuters.

The authors of the paper noted that savers may be viewed as having greater financial resources while spenders are viewed as more materialistic.

"It is notable that we observed this pattern in the shadow of the Great Recession, a time in which people who chronically spend may be viewed as especially irresponsible," they said. "Whether savers continue to be preferred in times of economic abundance is an important open question."

When the topic "Savers Are Sexy" was posted on Reddit, a social news and entertainment site, the feedback was mixed.

"Financial responsibility gets my engine going, aww yee," wrote Octopushug. "It … suggests the person is most likely relatively mature, is able to plan for the long term, may be generally responsible and considerate. … On the other side, a miser isn't that great either. Moderation is key."

The researchers concluded, "savers may win in the dating market, but only when potential mates do not crave excitement."

Can't buy me love: Study finds that savers are sexy 08/31/13 [Last modified: Sunday, September 1, 2013 6:28pm]
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