Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Business

Exercise financial caution when traveling

Whether traveling for business or pleasure, no one wants to worry about being scammed or exposed to identity theft. • "The truth is, when you're on a business trip or on vacation, you're distracted. You're either thinking about the deal or the swimming pool," said Adam Levin, co-founder of Identity Theft 911. • From phony Wi-Fi hot spots to "free vacation" come-ons, here's a rundown of some of the most common away-from-home scams.

Wake-up call

You're dead asleep and someone who says they're from the hotel front desk calls, asking to verify your credit card information. Groggy and without thinking, you recite it. Bingo, you've just landed in the hands of scammers.

"It's one of the great scams ever," Levin said. If you get such a call, say you'll call them back or that you're coming down to the lobby. Hang up and call your credit card company to ensure there's been no fraudulent activity.

'Free vacation' pitches

The come-ons land by postcard, letter or phone message: "Congratulations, you've won a free vacation!" to Tahiti, Tahoe or wherever. Typically, they require sitting through a sales presentation in order to receive your "free" round-trip airline tickets or three-day hotel voucher.

After enduring an hourslong, high-pressure sales pitch, problems can arise when consumers try to claim their freebie trip: The voucher covers less than promised, lots of blackout dates apply, or "it's just incredibly difficult to book the travel," said Cailin Peterson, Northeast California Better Business Bureau spokeswoman.

The promoters frequently employ several layers of marketers, schedulers and voucher "fulfillment" operators, which makes it difficult to get answers or resolve problems.

"They're not necessarily all bad. Some are legitimate," Peterson said, but consumers should be cautious.

Check the company's complaint history on bbb.org. Search the company's name and the word "scam" to see what pops up.

Social media fraud

Fake emails or websites — known as phishing — are nothing new online. But they've now migrated to social media sites like Facebook and Instagram, where phony look-alike accounts pose as legitimate companies. They post accounts promising free flights or other giveaways if you'll like, follow or comment on their site. It's actually a ruse to get you to divulge sensitive personal information.

The phony accounts ask you to click on a link that contains malicious software or direct you to sites that try to steal your credit card data or Social Security number.

Fake Wi-Fi hot spots

You're in the airport or at your hotel on a business trip or vacation. What's the first thing you do? Check for a Wi-Fi hot spot for your smartphone, tablet or laptop.

But you could unwittingly be falling victim to an identity thief, sitting nearby and armed with a USB-based antenna to lure you in. It could be a network that sounds like your hotel — "Hotel Wi-Fi," instead of "Holiday Inn Wi-Fi," for instance.

Identity thieves try to make their Wi-Fi hot spot the strongest available signal, which means your devices may automatically link to it. Once you're connected, it might ask for a credit card or your name and room number. They could be inserting malware or trying to steal your financial information.

To avoid it: If you're in a public space, ask for the building's official, specific Wi-Fi system. Ask your provider, like AT&T, for a virtual private network, or VPN, which is more secure. And never open personal email or access your financial accounts on a public connection.

Stranded traveler

This can be particularly effective during summer, when we expect our friends and family to be traveling. Scammers call or email with urgent messages that someone you know has been hit with an emergency that requires wiring funds immediately.

If you get such a request, call the person allegedly needing help to confirm he or she is really stranded.

Time-share offers

Preying on time-share owners eager to sell their unwanted vacation condos, scammers will offer to purchase the time share, often at inflated prices. As part of the offer, they require the consumer to deposit money in a supposed escrow account to cover fees. No surprise: The escrow company isn't real and you're out the deposit.

Fake vacation homes

Consumers view ads for a vacation home or resort rental and, based on the enticing description or photos, wire a deposit or put money onto a prepaid card, such as Green Dot. If it's a scam, when they arrive at their destination, they discover the address isn't real, the property isn't owned by the person who took the deposit or the "gorgeous" resort turns out to be rundown or even closed.

The BBB advises Googling the address to confirm the property exists and isn't out of business. If it's a third-party travel site, call the hotel or resort's 800 number to verify your reservation.

Wiring a deposit is always a red flag .

Comments
Passengers on fatal Southwest flight sue airline and manufacturers of plane and engine

Passengers on fatal Southwest flight sue airline and manufacturers of plane and engine

Eight passengers who were aboard a Southwest Airlines flight that was forced to make an emergency landing in Philadelphia after one of its engines blew apart filed suit Wednesday against the airline, Boeing and the companies that manufactured the eng...
Updated: 5 hours ago
Former employee sued by Tesla says he was a whistleblower

Former employee sued by Tesla says he was a whistleblower

Tesla sued a former employee Wednesday, accusing the man of hacking the automaker’s computer systems and stealing company secrets, shedding light on what chief Elon Musk had suggested was the work of a secretive internal saboteur.But the employee, Ma...
Updated: 5 hours ago
Seminole Heights restaurant Mortar & Pestle files for bankruptcy reorganization

Seminole Heights restaurant Mortar & Pestle files for bankruptcy reorganization

TAMPA — Mortar & Pestle, a fledgling Seminole Heights eatery with a mom-and-pop pharmacy theme, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization. Seacoast Bank was listed as the creditor with the largest unsecured claim: $1.4 million.The restaurant...
Updated: 10 hours ago
Could Lucky’s Market move in to Clearwater’s old Albertsons?

Could Lucky’s Market move in to Clearwater’s old Albertsons?

Lucky’s Market is considering a move in to the old Albertsons box space in Clearwater, according to preliminary plans filed with the city. Lucky’s master broker, Rick Lewellyn, was listed on an agenda as discussing renovating the existing property wi...
Updated: 11 hours ago
Developer proposes Sprouts Farmers Market for Land O’Lakes

Developer proposes Sprouts Farmers Market for Land O’Lakes

LAND O’LAKES – A Sarasota developer is proposing to turn a vacant Winn-Dixie store in central Pasco into a Sprouts Farmers Market or similar specialty grocer.Benderson Development filed preliminary plans Monday with Pasco County to redevelop the form...
Updated: 12 hours ago
Clearwater’s Clegg Insurance Group buys Advanced Insurance Brokerage

Clearwater’s Clegg Insurance Group buys Advanced Insurance Brokerage

CLEARWATER - Clegg Insurance Group of Clearwater announced on Wednesday it has bought Brandon-based Advanced Insurance Brokerage.The merger creates a firm with more than 2,000 customers and more than $10 million in annual premiums. Terms were not dis...
Published: 06/20/18
Wine dinners, beer projects and more will wet your whistle this summer

Wine dinners, beer projects and more will wet your whistle this summer

FILIPINO FOOD: WELCOME CHISMISHave you been to the Heights Public Market at the 73,000-square-foot Armature Works yet? It’s the buzzy food market in Tampa Heights with more than a dozen vendors offering up everything from rolled ice cream to Cuban sa...
Published: 06/20/18
Citizens considers hiking homeowners insurance rates about 8 percent

Citizens considers hiking homeowners insurance rates about 8 percent

Citizens Property Insurance Corp.’s is weighing another round of hefty rate hikes.Staffers with the state-run insurer of last resort have proposed raising the average rates for homeowners by 7.9 percent — just under the legislative cap of 10 percent ...
Published: 06/20/18
A tight supply cuts into Tampa Bay homes sales while prices keep rising

A tight supply cuts into Tampa Bay homes sales while prices keep rising

Tampa Bay’s two largest counties showed anemic home sales in May as prices continued to rise due to a tight supply.In Pinellas, sales of single-family home plunged nearly 12 percent from the previous May, the second-worst showing in a year. Prices, t...
Published: 06/20/18
Pinellas County files suit against companies who built Public Safety Complex

Pinellas County files suit against companies who built Public Safety Complex

CLEARWATER –– The Pinellas County Public Safety Complex was built to withstand a Category 5 hurricane, but officials now say the $81 million fortress has water leaks and cracked walls.The county filed a lawsuit this month against Harvard Jolly, the S...
Published: 06/20/18