Make us your home page
Instagram

Men's wages still struggling to recover from recession

WASHINGTON — Men continue to take a bigger hit in their paychecks than women because of lingering effects of the recession, according to a study by the Conference Board.

Average wages for women remain lower than those for their male counterparts by nearly 20 percent. But men's wages have been much slower to rebound from the effects of the recession, which had its most severe impact on male-dominated industries such as construction, the study found.

Although the recession technically ended in 2009, men's wage growth had rebounded to half the average rate of the previous decade by last year. Meanwhile, the growth in wages for women had almost fully recovered, the study said.

The findings came as the Obama administration has sparred with the campaign of presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney in recent weeks about which gender has suffered more in the down economy.

Romney said 92 percent of the jobs lost since President Barack Obama took office were held by women. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner called the claim ridiculous. The nonpartisan fact-checking group PolitiFact rated Romney's statistic "mostly false."

The Conference Board study didn't break down job losses by gender.

But it said a reason for the difference in wage growth is that the recession's effects were felt hardest in sectors such as construction and housing, where jobs are largely held by men. Consequently, those industries have a large supply of excess workers, keeping male wage growth low.

Wages for men and women each grew an average of about 3 percent annually from 1998 to 2008. But from 2008 to 2010, men's wages stayed constant while women's wages grew about 1 percent a year, the study said.

The study also found there was less wage growth for younger and low-skilled workers than for older and high-skilled workers.

Men's wages still struggling to recover from recession 04/26/12 [Last modified: Thursday, April 26, 2012 9:15pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Strategic Property Partners launches website for Water Street Tampa

    Business

    Strategic Property Partners has launched its official website for Water Street Tampa, its 53-acre redevelopment project in downtown Tampa Tuesday.

    Strategic Property Partners on Tuesday announced the name of its new development: Water Street Tampa. [Photos courtesy of SPP]
  2. ReliaQuest CEO Brian Murphy named sole Tampa Bay winner in EY state entrepreneur contest

    Business

    ReliaQuest founder and CEO Brian Murphy was named one of nine winners statewide and the only one from the Tampa Bay area in the Ernst and Young Entrepreneur Of The Year 2017 Florida Awards program. Murphy won in the IT security division after starting ReliaQuest in 2007. Five of the nine winners were from the Miami …

    Tampa's ReliaQuest founder and CEO Brian Murphy was named one of nine winners statewide and the only one from the Tampa Bay area in the Ernst and Young Entrepreneur Of The Year 2017 Florida Awards program. Murphy won in the IT security division after starting ReliaQuest in 2007.
  3. U.S. Rep. Charlie Crist and estranged wife Carole put Beach Drive condo on the market

    Real Estate

    ST. PETERSBURG — U.S. Rep. Charlie Crist and his estranged wife, Carole, have put their Beach Drive condo on the market for $1.5 million.

    Former Florida Gov. and current U.S. Rep. Charlie Crist and his estranged wife, Carole, have put their condo in downtown St. Petersburg on the market for $1.5 million. [Courtesy of Rhonda Sanderford]
  4. First WannaCry, now cyberattack Petya spreads from Russia to Britain

    Business

    Computer systems from Russia to Britain were victims of an international cyberattack Tuesday in a hack that bore similarities to a recent one that crippled tens of thousands of machines worldwide.

    A computer screen cyberattack warning notice reportedly holding computer files to ransom, as part of a massive international cyberattack, at an office in Kiev, Ukraine, on Tuesday.  A new and highly virulent outbreak of malicious data-scrambling software appears to be causing mass disruption across Europe.
[Oleg Reshetnyak via AP]