Sunday, June 17, 2018
Business

Tips for smart spending to build wealth

The significance of money and wealth goes far beyond material comforts and desires. It goes to the core of human emotions, including security, freedom, self-worth, envy and greed. • Regardless of how much money you earn, spending money well is the key to wealth. Having money gives you options. Not having it attracts stress and haunts relationships. • Those are a few of the insights I learned over a decade of writing more than 400 newspaper columns and two books on the topic of spending your money smarter. Here are spending smart fundamentals to consider in the new year.

Spending matters: Cost-cutting just to be a cheapskate is a worthless endeavor. But plugging the leaks of wasteful spending allows you to redirect cash to things that truly matter to you.

No such thing as "saving": Money is only good for one thing — spending it. Saving money is making a disciplined decision to spend later rather than now. It's envisioning your future self and deciding to be kind to that person.

Aim at something: "If you aim at nothing, you'll hit it every time," the saying goes. Brainstorm money goals and write them down, both long term and short term. Each objective must have a dollar figure and a date for completion. Once you have goals, your poor everyday spending decisions automatically improve.

Find a clue: Don't bother creating a budget. Just examine your past spending and categorize it. Money leaks will be obvious and, beware, they will cause dismay. "I spend $100 a month on convenience-store soft drinks?"

Get FIT: If you're overwhelmed with where to start, get FIT. That is, pay attention to spending on food, insurance and telecommunications, which includes phone and video-entertainment bills. Those three spending categories are sources of painless cost-cutting. Nearly every time I recommended that people shop for a better price on auto insurance, I get emailed success stories from pleased readers.

Compare prices: Failing to compare prices is making a choice to be powerless as a consumer. Research consistently shows that consumers buy from the first merchant they visit. With the Internet and smartphone applications that allow you to check prices, don't make a decision to be powerless.

Buy happiness: Shift discretionary spending from things to experiences — vacations, attending live events and visiting friends. Research shows memories of experiences are durable, improving with age because we tend to remember the good parts of an experience, while bad ones fade.

Happiness corollary: Throw money at a problem. If marital strife is dampening your happiness and conflict stems from arguments over housecleaning, hiring a maid can be money well spent. If mowing the lawn makes you miserable, hire a lawn service.

Cars are crucial: If you're careful with only one purchase, make it your next car. Buying new cars, especially luxury brands, is wealth-repellent. Their enormous prices and wicked depreciation sabotage household finances.

Recurring threats: Don't fret about a $100 one-time purchase. The killer expenses are the recurring ones. Three $30-a-month subscriptions don't sound like much, until you realize it's nearly $1,100 a year.

Cost per use: Is a purchase worthwhile? Examine its cost per use instead of purchase price. That's how a $150 pair of jeans that you wear often is a better deal than a $50 pair you seldom wear. Items you use daily do well in a cost-per-use analysis. Mattresses, coffee makers and computer monitors are examples.

Just do it: You don't have to perfect every aspect of your money-spending life right away. Get started with one issue that has been nagging you. Maybe you call and ask for a better cable TV rate, switch your banking to a credit union, or comb your credit card statement for easy spending cuts.

Gregory Karp, the author of Living Rich by Spending Smart, writes for the Chicago Tribune.

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