Saturday, November 18, 2017
Business

Quick rise for Rick Scott's latest jobs czar

RECOMMENDED READING


TALLAHASSEE — The Department of Economic Opportunity is one of the most critical agencies in Gov. Rick Scott's administration, and it has run through four directors — two permanent, two interim — since it launched 16 months ago.

After the fleeting tenures of three bureaucrats and a banker, Scott's handpicked director, Jesse Panuccio, began his term as the agency's fifth director three weeks ago.

A 32-year-old lawyer, Panuccio, is an outside-the-box choice for jobs chief. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 2006 and has been on Scott's legal team since 2011, becoming the governor's chief litigant last year.

After defending some of Scott's most controversial laws in the courtroom, Panuccio faces the crucial task of executing the governor's job-creation strategy from the state's official boardroom.

"I chose Jesse for three reasons," Scott said in a statement. "He is a problem solver, he is a skilled manager of people, and he is experienced at holding people and organizations accountable."

After graduating from Harvard Law, Panuccio clerked for a federal judge and then joined a boutique law firm in Washington. The New Jersey native said he took the Florida Bar Exam after spending much of his childhood vacationing in the Sunshine State, and was drawn to Scott's campaign message in 2010. He left Washington and joined the governor's transition team as deputy general counsel in January 2011.

In Panuccio's brief professional career, he has fought legal battles in support of conservative causes ranging from gun rights to traditional marriage to the state's rights. His new position will require a full embrace of Scott's conservative job-creation agenda: less regulation, taxation and litigation.

"My overall view is that the economy, the free market flourishes when government gets out of the way," he said.

The Department of Economic Opportunity, or DEO, is a 1,600-person agency responsible for overseeing many of the state's economic development initiatives. Created by Scott in 2011, DEO runs Florida's unemployment compensation system, collaborates job training efforts with regional workforce boards and oversees business incentives programs. As the $140,000-a-year director, Panuccio leads efforts to coordinate local and regional job-creation efforts, and implement an overarching economic development vision for the future.

He shares Scott's small-government approach to creating jobs, and embraces the idea of using taxpayer incentives to draw companies to Florida.

"I do think incentives, especially in a recessionary period like this, are a targeted way of reducing taxation and enhancing the business climate for competitive projects," he said. "It is a reality right now that we're competing with other states and other countries for these companies."

So far, Scott's approach on jobs has had mixed results. Florida's economy has improved in the past two years with a rapid decline in unemployment, but job growth is considerably slower than the national pace and wages continue to lag.

Meanwhile, DEO has come under fire — and a federal investigation — for restricting access to unemployment compensation benefits, making Florida one of the least generous states in the nation for those who are eligible for aid.

At DEO, turnover has been particularly problematic, with the agency's two permanent directors leaving after only a few months on the job, and a handful of other top officials resigning abruptly in recent months.

The agency's first director, Doug Darling, resigned last January, three months after DEO launched. Darling clashed with Scott's chief of staff and was forced out. He was replaced on an interim basis by Cynthia Lorenzo, who resigned from the agency five months later to help start a lobbying firm.

Scott looked to the private sector to select the agency's next permanent director, hiring career banker Hunting Deutsch in April.

Deutsch resigned seven months later, after the Florida Current reported that he had received jobless benefits for almost two years and took trips to Europe while accepting government aid.

Scott — who slashed the jobless aid program during his first term — said he did not know that his handpicked jobs chief had received 21 months worth of government benefits.

Two days after Deutsch's abrupt resignation, Scott tapped Panuccio to fill his position.

It was Scott's second time promoting Panuccio in the past 10 months, with the governor hailing his top lawyer as "the best person for the (DEO) job."

Panuccio credits hard work and a string of influential mentors for his rapid rise through the fields of law and government.

He met one of those mentors, Charles Cooper, while working as an associate at the Washington law firm Cooper & Kirk LLC.

At the firm — which is described in Legal Times as a "top choice" for "plaintiffs who want to sue the federal government" — Panuccio litigated cases ranging from challenging gun restrictions in Chicago and Texas to fighting to uphold California's Proposition 8, which outlaws gay marriage.

After joining the Scott administration, Panuccio continued to fight for conservative causes in court — this time in defense of Florida's most controversial laws. As Scott's general counsel, Panuccio led a legal team tasked with defending constitutionally questionable proposals enacted by Scott. After his election, Scott's deeply conservative agenda sparked a deluge of constitutional lawsuits over plans that included drug tests for welfare recipients, bans on gun inquiries by doctors and purging noncitizens from voter rolls.

The Florida Supreme Court upheld the pension law and other cases are pending on appeal.

Cooper, a former Reagan official who has seen many of his proteges — including U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas — ascend to political prominence, said Panuccio may have his sights on higher office.

"I have no doubt that this is the next step on Jesse's path to something more," Cooper said. "He has the kind personal attributes that I think would serve him well if he did pursue his own kind of political future."

Asked about whether he's prepping for a career in politics, the 32-year-old threw his head back in laughter, straightened his suit and gave a polished answer:

"Right now, I'm focused on this job and making sure that this agency is transparent, accountable and efficient."

Comments

Parents, children welcome downsized MOSI in Tampa

TAMPA — Avery, 6, slid his sneakers up the side of 200-pound rubber tire from the space shuttle Columbia and sat on top.His father, Ilder Jeannot, called for him to get off of it — usually climbing on museum displays is frowned upon. But in the new M...
Updated: 9 hours ago
Florida jobs recover from Irma, unemployment rate drops

Florida jobs recover from Irma, unemployment rate drops

As economists predicted, the tough hit that Florida jobs took from Hurricane Irma was not long-lived. The state added 125,300 jobs in October, almost breaking even from the 127,400 jobs it lost in September. According to state figures released Friday...
Published: 11/17/17
Apple will postpone release of  HomePod

Apple will postpone release of HomePod

The Washington PostApple said Friday that it’s pushing back its plans for a Siri-powered smart speaker until sometime early next year.The HomePod speaker was announced in June, with an initial launch date set for December. Apple said that its smart s...
Published: 11/17/17
HSN, Good Housekeeping pick five contest finalists

HSN, Good Housekeeping pick five contest finalists

ST. PETERSBURG — Good Housekeeping and St. Petersburg-based HSN have chosen five finalists for their entrepreneur competition. The partners are searching for a novel item to promote as endorsed by the Good Housekeeping Seal, denoting reliability and ...
Published: 11/17/17
Trigaux: State of Tampa Bay startups? Disconnected we falter but there’s a plan to fix that

Trigaux: State of Tampa Bay startups? Disconnected we falter but there’s a plan to fix that

How are we doing?That was the Big Question posed more than once this past week in Tampa Bay. First, the Tampa Bay Partnership and USF debuted in-depth and new ways to measure Tampa Bay across a wide range of indicators to gauge whether we are gaining...
Published: 11/17/17
Tesla’s latest creation: An electric big rig that can travel 500 miles on a single charge

Tesla’s latest creation: An electric big rig that can travel 500 miles on a single charge

The main course was expected: a pair of sleek silver Tesla semi-trucks that get 500 miles per charge, go from zero to 60 mph in five seconds and — if the hype is to be believed — promise to single-handedly transform the commercial trucking industry.B...
Published: 11/17/17
We ask Tampa Bay startup leaders how best to advance entrepreneurial ecosystem

We ask Tampa Bay startup leaders how best to advance entrepreneurial ecosystem

What one thing could be added to the Tampa Bay startup community to help it grow and prosper?The Tampa Bay Times reached out to these leading area entrepreneurs and startup experts for answers.RELATED COVERAGE: Trigaux: State of Tampa Bay startups? D...
Published: 11/17/17
Before you hit the mall: here are some key holiday shopping hours

Before you hit the mall: here are some key holiday shopping hours

Plotting a shopping strategy for the holiday weekend? Here’s a look at holiday store opening hours for some major retailers:Thanksgiving8 a.m.: Kmart1 p.m.: JCPenney4 p.m.: GameStop5 p.m.: Best Buy, Macy’s, Toys "R" Us, Kohl’s6 p.m.: Old Navy, Target...
Published: 11/17/17
Electric, autonomous vehicles featured at Tampa auto show

Electric, autonomous vehicles featured at Tampa auto show

TAMPA — The two biggest trends in the automotive space are ones you’ve likely heard of: electric vehicles and autonomous cars. Both will feature prominently at the Tampa Bay International Auto Show today through Sunday. The event at the ...
Published: 11/17/17
Developer changes approach as downtown Largo project lags in financing

Developer changes approach as downtown Largo project lags in financing

LARGO — Driving down West Bay Drive, you may notice some changes to downtown Largo.A new 29-unit apartment complex on Ridge Road stands finished and ready for residents. South of the complex, land that was formerly home to a community of rundown cott...
Published: 11/17/17