Make us your home page
Instagram

Home sales in June fall across U.S., Tampa Bay area

WASHINGTON — People are buying homes at the weakest pace in 14 years.

Sales of previously occupied homes fell in June for a third straight month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.77 million, the National Association of Realtors said Wednesday.

This year's pace is lagging the 4.91 million homes sold last year — the fewest since 1997. In a healthy economy, people buy about 6 million homes per year.

The median sales price rose in June to $184,300, according to the Realtors' group, mainly because of an annual post-spring bump that drove prices higher in the Northeast and West.

The glut of unsold homes rose slightly in June to 3.77 million homes. At last month's sales pace, it would take 9.5 months to clear those homes. Analysts say a healthy supply can be cleared in six months.

In the Tampa Bay area, sales and prices of existing homes slumped in June.

Tampa Bay area sales fell 11 percent compared to a year ago, with just 2,860 homes changing hands. The median sales price, meanwhile, dropped to $126,500, down 9 percent from the $138,400 average a year ago.

Fewer first-time home buyers are entering the market. Many can't obtain a loan or meet larger down-payment requirements.

Another problem is that a growing number of contracts are being canceled before sales are finalized, many because of lower appraisals that are scuttling loans. And the slowdown in hiring is making people think twice about taking on extra debt.

High unemployment, millions of foreclosures and tighter credit are likely to keep people from buying homes in the second half of the year, economists say. Even low home prices and cheap mortgage rates are unlikely to draw buyers to the market.

"Given the state of the job market, and some reluctance among banks to lend and households to borrow, this lackluster pace of sales is not too surprising," said Alistair Bentley, an economist at TD Economics.

First-time home buyers, who are critical to a strong and stable housing markets, have shrunk to 31 percent of sales, the lowest percentage since January 2010. Normally, first-time buyers make up about half of all home sales.

Home sales have fallen in four of the past five years, forcing prices down in most markets. Declining home values have made people feel less wealthy, and as a result they are spending less.

Some sales are falling apart at the last minute. Roughly 16 percent of home deals were canceled last month. That's four times the percentage in May and the highest level since such records began being kept more than a year ago. A sale isn't final until a mortgage is closed.

Buyers have canceled purchases after appraisals showed that the homes were worth less than the buyers' initial bids. Millions of foreclosures have made it harder to get accurate appraisals that all parties can agree on.

Foreclosures and short sales — when a lender agrees to sell for less than what is owed on a mortgage — made up about 30 percent of all home sales last month, up from about 10 percent in past years. And a wave of foreclosures are being held up, either by backlogged courts or lenders awaiting state and federal probes into troubled foreclosure practices.

Tampa Bay area sales

2,860 Homes sold in June,

a drop of 11 percent

compared to a year ago.

$126,500 Median sales price in June, down 9 percent from the $138,400 average a year ago.

Home sales in June fall across U.S., Tampa Bay area 07/20/11 [Last modified: Wednesday, July 20, 2011 9:39pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. New owners take over downtown St. Petersburg's Hofbräuhaus

    Retail

    ST. PETERSBURG — The downtown German beer-hall Hofbräuhaus St. Petersburg has been bought by a partnership led by former Checkers Drive-In Restaurants president Keith Sirois.

    The Hofbrauhaus, St. Petersburg, located in the former historic Tramor Cafeteria, St. Petersburg, is under new ownership.
[SCOTT KEELER  |  TIMES]

  2. Boho Hunter will target fashions in Hyde Park

    Business

    Boho Hunter, a boutique based in Miami's Wynwood District, will expand into Tampa with its very first franchise.

    Palma Canaria bags will be among the featured items at Boho Hunter when it opens in October. Photo courtesy of Boho Hunter.
  3. Gallery now bringing useful art to Hyde Park customers

    Business

    HYDE PARK — In 1998, Mike and Sue Shapiro opened a gallery in St. Petersburg along Central Ave., with a majority of the space dedicated to Sue's clay studio.

     As Sue Shapiro continued to work on her pottery in St. Petersburg, her retail space grew and her studio shrunk. Now Shapiro's is bringing wares like these to Hyde Park Village. Photo courtesy of Shapiro's.
  4. Appointments at Raymond James Bank and Saint Leo University highlight this week's Tampa Bay business Movers & Shakers

    Business

    Banking

    Raymond James Bank has hired Grace Jackson to serve as executive vice president and chief operating officer. Jackson will oversee all of Raymond James Bank's operational business elements, risk management and strategic planning functions. Kackson joins Raymond James Bank after senior …

    Raymond James Bank has hired Grace Jackson to serve as executive vice president and chief operating officer. [Company handout]
  5. Cooking passion spurs owner to pull open AJ's Kitchen Drawer

    Business

    TAMPA — After graduating from the University of Tampa in May 2016, AJ Albrecht spent four months traveling around Southeast Asia and Australia.

    AJs Kitchen Drawer offers a wide variety of unique kitchenware items, such as handcrafted knives and wooden items, as well as local gourmet products. Photo by Danielle Hauser