Make us your home page
Instagram

Kenneth R. Harney: Settlement sheds light on fees paid to realty agents who promoted home warranties

Home warranty pitch draws some scrutiny

WASHINGTON — The settlement of a major class-action suit is shedding new light on a controversial real estate practice: fees paid to realty brokers and agents for promoting home warranty policies.

The case involves potentially thousands of home buyers and sellers who purchased warranty coverage from American Home Shield Corp. between May 2008 and March of this year. American Home Shield is the dominant player in the home warranty field, with sales of $657 million in 2010, according to the company. Home warranty policies offer repairs and replacements for owners when specified home systems and appliances malfunction.

Attorneys representing the plaintiffs say as many as 500,000 consumers may be members of the suit. The plaintiffs alleged that American Home Shield violated federal law by paying kickbacks to realty brokerage firms and agents for promoting warranty policies to their customers. The Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act prohibits payments for referrals of "settlement services" in connection with most mortgage transactions. It also bans the giving or receiving of fees or other compensation when no substantive services are rendered.

American Home Shield denied any wrongdoing in the settlement, and said it sought to limit its exposure to litigation costs by resolving the dispute. The complaint, filed by homeowners in Alabama, involved payment of a $524 fee at closing for a one-year home warranty from American Home Shield. A portion of that amount allegedly was paid to the realty agent by American Home Shield.

Realtors and consumer groups say payments like these are rarely disclosed to buyers or sellers but have been commonplace in the industry. Typical warranty policies cost anywhere from $400 to $500; fees to realty brokers and agents range from $60 to $90. Warranty companies took in an estimated $1.5 billion in sales during 2009, according to Warranty Week.

Douglas R. Miller, executive director of Consumer Advocates in American Real Estate and former head of a title insurance agency in Minnesota, calls payments to realty brokers and agents by home warranty companies "bribes," whether clients know about them or not.

But the 1.1 million-member National Association of Realtors has been outspoken on the issue, arguing that federal antikickback regulations should not cover warranties because they are not "settlement services" and have no effect on the closing of a real estate transaction. In a letter to the Department of Housing and Urban Development — the chief regulator of the settlement statute — the association argued that brokers and agents provide a service in alerting sellers and buyers to the existence of warranties.

"Consumers are often not familiar with the numerous home warranty products," wrote Vicki Cox Golder, 2010 association president. "Real estate brokers and agents do not merely flash a brochure concerning these products to individual buyers and sellers." Instead, they "devote valuable time educating consumers about the features, limitations, coverage and pricing of home warranties."

HUD has disagreed, however. In an interpretive rule issued last summer, HUD said that "a real estate broker or agent actively promoting (a home warranty company) and its products to sellers or prospective homebuyers" for compensation is considered to be making a "referral" that violates federal law. If a factual analysis demonstrates that agents provided substantive services beyond their normal duties, the department said, then the fees may not be in violation — a ruling that Realtors have said is vague.

Attorneys for the plaintiffs in the American Home Shield settlement cited the HUD guidance extensively. Other class-action suits challenging home warranty payments to agents are at various stages in federal courts around the country, according to attorneys familiar with the issue.

Ask for full disclosure on fees. And, before you sign up, go online and check customer reviews for whatever company is being promoted. Some consumers aren't happy about the $400 to $500 service.

Kenneth R. Harney can be reached at [email protected]

Kenneth R. Harney: Settlement sheds light on fees paid to realty agents who promoted home warranties 07/02/11 [Last modified: Saturday, July 2, 2011 4:31am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Special to the Times.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Wing of Channelside Bay Plaza being demolished to make way for Water Street Tampa

    Business

    TAMPA — The developers of Channelside Bay Plaza originally wanted the name to include "Garrison." That would have fit, in a way, because the complex turned out to be fort-like, inwardly focused and unwelcoming.

    Demolition of the southwest wing of Channelside Bay Plaza is underway, with a big chunk of the building expected to come down today.
  2. City Council candidates weigh in on noise ordinances, pier reconstruction

    Local

    ST. PETERSBURG — Residents of Bayfront Tower Condos peppered City Council candidates Tuesday night with questions about noise ordinances, road repairs and the multi-million-dollar plan to rebuild the pier.

  3. Black entrepreneur says city stiffing him on project after he endorsed Rick Baker

    News

    ST. PETERSBURG — A prominent African-American resident says his endorsement of mayoral candidate Rick Baker has led city officials to freeze him out of a major construction project along the historic "Deuces" stretch of 22nd Street S.

  4. Sen. Nelson urges FEMA to examine high number of denied flood claims

    Banking

    Sen. Bill Nelson urged FEMA on Tuesday to ensure fairness, proper oversight and transparency in processing Hurricane Irma aid following a report by the Palm Beach Post that 90 percent of Irma claims under the National Flood Insurance Program had been denied.

    Sen. Bill Nelson is calling for FEMA to ensure the flood claims process post-Hurricane Irma is fair and ethical following reports that 90 percent of claims under the National Flood Insurance Program were denied. | [Times file photo]
  5. Amazon expands in Tampa with Pop-Up shop in International Plaza

    Retail

    TAMPA — A new retailer known largely for its online presence has popped up at International Plaza and Bay Street.

    Shoppers walk past the new Amazon kiosk Tuesday at the International Plaza in Tampa. The kiosk, which opened last month, offers shoppers an opportunity to touch and play with some of the products that Amazon offers.
[CHRIS URSO   |   Times]