Clear67° FULL FORECASTClear67° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

March housing starts pass 1 million mark

A worker frames a new home under construction in Matthews, N.C., late last month. Housing starts passed the 1 million mark in March, the first time that has happened in nearly five years.

Associated Press

A worker frames a new home under construction in Matthews, N.C., late last month. Housing starts passed the 1 million mark in March, the first time that has happened in nearly five years.

WASHINGTON — U.S. home builders passed the 1 million mark in March, the first time since June 2008. The gain signals continued strength for the housing recovery at the start of the spring buying season.

The overall pace of homes started rose 7 percent from February to March to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.04 million, the Commerce Department said Tuesday.

Apartment construction, which tends to fluctuate sharply from month to month, led the surge. It jumped nearly 31 percent to an annual rate of 417,000, the fastest pace since January 2006.

By contrast, single-family home building, which makes up nearly two-thirds of the market, fell 4.8 percent to an annual rate of 619,000. That was down from February's pace of 650,000, the fastest since May 2008.

March's pace of homes started was nearly 46 percent higher than in the same month in 2012.

Applications for building permits, a gauge of future construction, declined 3.9 percent to an annual rate of 902,000 from February's rate of 939,000, which was also nearly a five-year high.

The jump in home building is expected to contribute to economic growth in 2013 for a second straight year — a reversal from 2006 through 2011, when it held back the economy.

Deutsche Bank predicts that home construction will reach an annual pace of 1.2 million by year's end. Brett Ryan, an economist at Deutsche Bank, said that rate could add half a percentage point to 2013 growth, which would be the biggest contribution from housing since 2004.

The housing recovery could spur an additional percentage point of growth by encouraging more consumer spending, Ryan said. More building and higher home sales mean Americans will likely spend more on things like furniture and landscaping. Higher home prices also create a "wealth effect" that gives homeowners the confidence to spend more.

Housing construction fell 5.8 percent in the Northeast but gained in the rest of the country, led by a 10.9 percent rise in the South. It rose 9.6 percent in the Midwest and 2.7 percent in the West.

Construction firms have stepped up hiring in recent months, adding 18,000 jobs in March and 169,000 since September, according to the Labor Department.

Though new homes represent only a fraction of the housing market, they have an outsize impact on the economy. Each home built creates an average of three jobs for a year and generates about $90,000 in tax revenue, according to statistics from the home builders.

Other economic reports

• The consumer price index declined a seasonally adjusted 0.2 percent in March, after jumping 0.7 percent in February, the Labor Department said Tuesday. Gas prices fell 4.4 percent, reversing part of February's 9.1 percent gain. Except for February's large increase, consumer prices have declined or been unchanged in four of the past five months. In the past year, consumer prices have risen 1.5 percent, the smallest yearly increase in the past eight months.

• Production at the nation's factories, mines and utilities rose 0.4 percent in March from February, the Federal Reserve said. Utility output rose 5.3 percent, as Americans had to use more heat during a colder-than-normal March. And production of autos and auto parts surged 2.9 percent, the second straight monthly gain. Overall factory production slipped 0.1 percent, dragged down by falling metal production and clothing. Still, consumer goods climbed 1.1 percent, matching February's gain.

March housing starts pass 1 million mark 04/16/13 [Last modified: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 11:56pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...