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Businesses tap into growing market of organic, natural pet food

BETHLEHEM, Pa. — Organic kibble? All-natural chow? Cats and dogs don't know it, but their owners want them to eat better — and they are forking over big bucks to make it happen.

Marketed as a healthier, more nutritious alternative, some premium dog and cat cuisine has gone the Whole Foods route.

Nowhere is that more evident than in the new $25 million eastern Pennsylvania factory of upstart pet food maker Freshpet, where thousands of pounds of fresh meat and poultry are pasteurized, mixed with vegetables and then immediately chilled, packaged and sent to branded, refrigerated display cases in more than 10,000 stores across America.

The 7-year-old company, founded by former Purina executives, is trying to establish a new category in an industry long dominated by kibbles and cans: fresh, preservative-free food that requires refrigeration. With sales exceeding $100 million, executives say they're on their way.

"People are trying to eat healthier, less processed, simpler foods, and I think they are applying that logic when they're making pet food decisions," said Scott Morris, Freshpet's president and co-founder.

Major manufacturers like Nestle Purina and Del Monte Foods are also capitalizing on consumers' willingness to spend more on food they perceive to be better for their furry friends.

Even through the Great Recession, premium dog and cat food — the latest iteration of which is advertised as "natural" and "organic" — has been claiming an ever-bigger share of the market. Sales of the more expensive brands jumped 68 percent from 2002 to 2012, compared with 19 percent for mid-priced brands and just 8 percent for economy brands, according to Euromonitor International.

Marketing experts say manufacturers are tapping into a number of powerful trends and emotions: Americans' interest in healthy eating, the rising popularity of organic food, the tendency to humanize pets.

"People think of their pets not as pets, but as members of their family, and they want to treat the members of their family with the same respect as they treat themselves," said Molly Maier, senior analyst at market research firm Mintel Group Ltd.

Nestle, the No. 1 pet food maker, has reported solid growth in its high-end, "made with natural ingredients" Beyond line. Del Monte, whose brands include Kibbles 'n Bits and Meow Mix, purchased premium pet food maker Natural Balance in July. "Higher consumer spending on more premium pet products will continue to drive market expansion," Del Monte said.

Despite its explosive growth, Freshpet of Secaucus, N.J., remains a tiny player in the $17 billion dog and cat food market. Morris sees the company as fundamentally different, its new "Freshpet Kitchens" factory in Bethlehem using ingredients and processes adapted from human food production.

But the jury's still out on whether food marketed as "fresh," "organic" or "natural" helps pets lead longer or healthier lives.

Theoretically, it's hard to argue with the idea that minimally processed and preservative-free food like the kind Freshpet makes would be better for dogs and cats, said Amy Farcas, a veterinary clinical nutritionist at the University of Pennsylvania. But she said the research to prove it is lacking.

Farcas routinely advises her clients that as long as their dog is the appropriate weight, healthy and energetic, they probably don't need a diet change.

"Nutritionally, most adult dog foods would be considered appropriate for most adult dogs," she said.

All in the label

Pet food labeling is regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Many states have also adopted labeling standards published by the Association of American Feed Control Officials. Consumers should pay close attention to labels when buying food for their dogs and cats:

• Products labeled as "premium," "super premium" or "holistic" are not required to contain different or higher-quality ingredients. They are marketing terms.

• Products labeled "natural" by and large may not contain artificial flavors, colors or preservatives.

• Products labeled "organic" must follow strict U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines for human organic food.

Businesses tap into growing market of organic, natural pet food 11/01/13 [Last modified: Friday, November 1, 2013 7:50pm]
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