Make us your home page
Instagram

Colombia's Juan Valdez cafes poised to challenge Starbucks

BOGOTA, Colombia — When coffee giant Starbucks recently announced it was bringing its frappuccinos and skinny lattes to Colombia — where a cup of coffee is better known as a tinto — it sparked jokes about selling ice to Eskimos and captured global headlines. But it also obscured a growing contender in the global caffeine war, Colombia's Juan Valdez coffee shops.

The high-end java retailer is already in eight countries — including the United States, where it has stores in Washington, D.C.; New York; and Miami International Airport. But it has far more ambitious plans.

In the next year or so, it will open locations in Central America, South Korea, Malaysia and throughout the Middle East.

It also has venti-sized aspirations for Florida. Starting early next year, Juan Valdez expects to open the first of 50 or 60 locations in South Florida, said Hernan Mendez, chief executive of Procafecol, which operates the Juan Valdez chain.

The company that will lead Juan Valdez's incursion into the heartland of cafe cubano is JVC Franco LLC.

"Juan Valdez is a high-quality brand and product, and we're confident that it will be successful in Florida," said Rafael Belloso with JVC Franco, who is also a longtime Burger King franchisee through his company Beboca. "This is a niche where Juan Valdez can develop into a global brand."

Homeland advantage

When the coffee shops were launched in 2002, Juan Valdez was already a household name. The mustachioed farmer and his mule Conchita are the personification of Colombian coffee, and they have been promoting it around the globe since the 1950s, when the characters were hatched by a Manhattan ad firm.

The coffee chain, owned by the National Federation of Colombian Coffee Growers, simply capitalized on the name.

But you won't find many farmers in ponchos at the cafes. In many ways the Juan Valdez chain is Colombia's answer to Starbucks: It sells high-end brew to urbanites willing to pay a premium for their black fantastic. And for the most part, it has gone unchallenged on its home turf.

At the Procafecol headquarters in a trendy area of Bogota, Mendez admits Starbucks' arrival is a game-changer. But he also thinks Juan Valdez has home-field advantage.

"We don't feel a threat seeing them here and I think it would be good for people to really compare and see what the difference is," he said. "We think we have an edge on quality. And we have (169) stores with great locations. That's a very big asset."

In countries where the two companies are competing, such as Mexico and Aruba, Juan Valdez is holding its own, Mendez said. Chile is a prime example. There, Juan Valdez has 13 stores, many of which are close to the 50 stores that Starbucks operates.

"We monitor perceptions and what our (Chilean) clients say," Mendez explained. "What they always bring out is the quality of the coffee. There is a very big base of consumers who would prefer the 100 percent Colombian coffee that we serve in our stores versus blends that Starbucks might have."

Colombia was an obvious target for Starbucks. The country is seeing strong growth and a burgeoning middle class. In addition, Starbucks has been buying Colombian beans for more than 40 years, when it was just a little shop in Seattle.

While many coffee chains tout their fair-trade status and brag about what they give back to farmers, Juan Valdez is the only international chain of its size that actually belongs to coffee producers. The store has given back about $20 million in royalties to farmers since it started, Mendez said.

Colombians, for one, will appreciate that, he said.

"Colombians have a very deep emotional connection with Juan Valdez, and there's a sense of national pride," he said. "That gives us a very big loyal customer base, and that will help with the competition."

Belloso, the South Florida franchisee, thinks quality will trump variety. Asked if the Juan Valdez experience will be tweaked for South Florida, he said: "We're not going to change a thing."

Colombia's Juan Valdez cafes poised to challenge Starbucks 11/11/13 [Last modified: Monday, November 11, 2013 8:26pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Tribune News Service.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Tampa Bay is ground-zero for assignment of benefits cases over broken auto glass

    Banking

    When Rachel Thorpe tried to renew her auto insurance last year for her Toyta RAV4, she was stunned to see her monthly premium had nearly doubled to $600. The Sarasota driver was baffled since her only recent claim was over a broken windshield.

    Auto glass lawsuits filed by a third party (through what's known as assignment of benefits) are skyrocketing in Tampa Bay.
[Times file photo]
  2. Siesta Beach tops Dr. Beach's rankings of best locations in America

    Tourism

    Three beaches in Florida made it on a highly coveted list of the top 10 in America this year, ranked by Dr. Stephen Leatherman, a.k.a. "Dr. Beach."

    This May 18, 2017 photo shows Siesta Beach on Siesta Key in Sarasota, Fla. Siesta Beach is No. 1 on the list of best beaches for the summer of 2017 compiled by Stephen Leatherman, also known as Dr. Beach, a professor at Florida International University. [Chris O'Meara | Associated Press]
  3. Brooksville's popular Florida Cracker Kitchen aims at statewide expansion

    Retail

    BROOKSVILLE — Florida Cracker Kitchen's inverted cowboy boot logo — seemingly plastered on every pickup truck in Hernando County — may someday be just as ubiquitous across the state.

    Shrimp and grits is a signature dish at Florida Cracker Kitchen, which plans to open more restaurants in the state.
  4. Alison Barlow named director to spur creative economy, jobs of St. Pete Innovation District

    Economic Development

    After an extensive search, the recently created St. Pete Innovation District now has its first executive director. Alison Barlow on Thursday was named to the position in which she will help recruit and facilitate a designated downtown St. Petersburg area whose assets and members range from USF St. Petersburg, Johns …

    Alison Barlow has been named the first executive director of the recently created St. Pete Innovation District, a designated downtown St. Petersburg area whose assets and members range from USF St. Petersburg, Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital and Poynter Institute to SRI International and the USF College of Marine Science, among many other organizations. Barlow, who most recently served as manager of the Collaborative Labs at St. Petersburg College, starts her new job June 16.[Photo courtesy of LinkedIn]
  5. Trigaux: Amid a record turnout, regional technology group spotlights successes, desire to do more

    Business

    ST. PETERSBURG — They came. They saw. They celebrated Tampa Bay's tech momentum.

    A record turnout event by the Tampa Bay Technology Forum, held May 24 at the Mahaffey Theater in St. Petersburg, featured a panel of area tech executives talking about the challenges encountered during their respective mergers and acquisitions. Show, from left to right, are: Gerard Purcell, senior vice president of global IT integration at Tech Data Corp.; John Kuemmel, chief information officer at Triad Retail Media, and Chris Cate, chief operating officer at Valpak. [Robert Trigaux, Times]