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New Jersey officials charge 29 in counterfeit goods ring

NEWARK, N.J. — Federal officials in New Jersey announced charges against 29 people Friday in what they said was one of the largest counterfeit goods operations ever uncovered in the United States.

The two separate but intersecting groups, operating primarily out of China, combined to import items with a retail value of more than $300 million, U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman said.

"The cost of counterfeit goods is not limited to the massive financial harm it causes to American businesses and consumers," Fishman said. "The same channels and criminal networks that allow the entry of these goods provides the opportunity for the importation of other materials that threaten our health and safety."

The groups are accused of smuggling counterfeit UGG boots and Nike sneakers; Burberry, Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Coach handbags and other clothing items; and cigarettes. Three defendants are charged with conspiring to import 50 kilograms of crystal methamphetamine.

Twenty-three people, including 19 in the New York-New Jersey region, were arrested and others were being sought, Fishman said.

The defendants face a smorgasbord of charges including conspiracy, trafficking in counterfeit goods, evading financial reporting requirements, money laundering and importing methamphetamine. The drug charges carry maximum penalties of life in prison.

According to indictments unsealed Friday, the counterfeit items were manufactured in China, then shipped to the United States in boxes that were deliberately mislabeled to keep shipping costs down. The goods came through the Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal, the busiest port on the East Coast.

From there, the goods were taken to warehouses in the area where co-conspirators would remove generic outer labels to expose the counterfeit brand name labels, according to the indictment. The goods were then sold to wholesale and retail outlets.

A tip received by Immigration and Customs Enforcement in northern Virginia led to an undercover effort that ultimately led to the arrests.

According to the U.S. Attorney's Office, federal agents set up a shipping company that presented itself as having connections at the New Jersey port to help the smuggling scheme. The conspirators allegedly paid more than $900,000 to the fictional company between August 2008 and February 2012.

Authorities say a key player was Ning Guo, who allegedly served as a nexus between the two smuggling groups. Nicknamed "The Beijing Kid," Guo is portrayed in the indictments as having his hand in smuggling, warehousing and distributing the counterfeit goods. Guo faces conspiracy, counterfeit goods trafficking and money laundering charges.

New Jersey officials charge 29 in counterfeit goods ring 03/02/12 [Last modified: Friday, March 2, 2012 11:59pm]
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