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Retailers try to cash in on new credit card fee transparency

Mitch Goldstone, president of ScanMyPhotos, was a lead plaintiff in antitrust litigation over “swipe fees.” Visa, MasterCard and banks that issue their cards agreed to bargain with retailers. “The balance of power is going to shift very fast,” Goldstone said.

GARY FRIEDMAN | Los Angeles Times/MCT

Mitch Goldstone, president of ScanMyPhotos, was a lead plaintiff in antitrust litigation over “swipe fees.” Visa, MasterCard and banks that issue their cards agreed to bargain with retailers. “The balance of power is going to shift very fast,” Goldstone said.

LOS ANGELES

Most small-business owners regarded the rising fees they paid to Visa and MasterCard as an unavoidable cost of doing business. Not among them was Irvine, Calif., photo processor Mitch Goldstone.

Contending that a price-fixing cartel was exploiting him and other entrepreneurs, Goldstone went to war in media interviews, blog posts and as a lead plaintiff in a giant class-action lawsuit, comparing the payment processors to drug pushers and to the railroads that profited at the expense of farmers.

What Goldstone calls his "Erin Brockovich moment" arrived with the recent $7.2 billion settlement with Visa, MasterCard and the banks that issue their cards after seven years of antitrust battles in federal court in Brooklyn, N.Y. The agreement will shift power to sellers of goods and services and could transform how — and whether — millions of Americans use their credit cards.

That's because Visa and MasterCard agreed for the first time to bargain with groups of retailers over fees, so small businesses can team up to gain leverage. The agreement also allows merchants for the first time to charge customers extra for using credit cards, so long as the charges reflect the actual cost and are broken out clearly for consumers to see.

That would drag the processing charges — formally known as interchange fees, colloquially called swipe fees — into the light, so consumers can finally see how costly they are to the businesses they patronize.

"If you ask customers what's an interchange fee, they'll say it has something to do with a freeway," Goldstone said. "And millions and millions of merchants just accepted it as a cost of doing business."

The interchange fees are complex as well as arcane. The latest version of MasterCard's online rate summary, current as of April, runs 131 pages.

The Federal Reserve last year cut debit card fees from 44 cents to 21 cents per transaction. But credit card fees run much higher, especially for popular rewards cards, averaging 2 percent of a purchase price and reaching 5 percent for minor purchases from small retailers — a cost most Americans have been blissfully unaware of.

Goldstone says the ability to bargain collectively will gradually bring down card costs for retailers, who in a competitive environment will pass along the savings to customers.

Imposing credit card surcharges is trickier. For one thing, the practice is banned in 10 states, including Florida.

Then there's the question of whether sellers even find it worthwhile to create a two-tier payment system. A previous Visa and MasterCard settlement with the U.S. Justice Department allowed merchants to offer discounts to cash customers, which has the same effect as a surcharge on credit card users. But few consumers appear to find the offer appealing.

Indeed, many retailers say credit cards are king these days, despite efforts by some jewelers, spa owners, movers and even dentists to entice shoppers to pay with cash.

Annie Williams, who runs the Los Angeles restaurant Bulan Thai, said credit cards are among her biggest expenses, with fees so complicated that "we don't know how much it's going to be until we get the bill."

The restaurant tried offering customers a 5 percent cash discount, but gave up in July "because it doesn't work," she said.

"I have to say, 95 percent of customers pay with credit cards," Williams said. "They think about the (reward) points that the credit card companies offer."

Anisha Sekar, vice president for card products at the personal finance site NerdWallet, said that despite such stories, she believes many retailers will at least experiment with charging separately for credit cards. It makes sense that the cost should be separate and transparent, she said, like the airline baggage fee that travelers can avoid by using carry-on luggage.

"If prices are going up because it costs more to transport meat, there's not a lot we can do about it. And it's shared equally by everyone who wants to buy meat," Sekar said. "But if you can break out the cost for using a credit card and can decide not to pay it (by using cash, a check or a debit card), then that's a different matter."

Goldstone thinks few merchants will impose surcharges but says the threat will force the card companies to lower their fees. "The balance of power is going to shift very fast," he said.

Retailers try to cash in on new credit card fee transparency 08/03/12 [Last modified: Friday, August 3, 2012 10:34pm]
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