Make us your home page
Instagram
Everybody's Business

Rooster & the Till to crow soon in Seminole Heights

SEMINOLE HEIGHTS — Locally grown products, fresh from farms and gardens, will have diners crowing about the Rooster & the Till, opening in early December on Florida Ave and Lambright Street in Seminole Heights.

The restaurant's small plate menu emphasizes charcuterie, house-crafted sausage and ham, and artisanal cheeses. "Humanely raised goat, lamb, duck, pork, beef and chicken will be sourced locally," said co-owner chef Ferrell Alvarez. "Cooked with love and care."

One speciality of the house is Rabbit Ballotine, accompanied by goat milk grits, pork-belly braised collards, chicken livers and raisins.

A chalk board announces the daily raw bar deliveries of shellfish, oysters, clams and other pesce crudo.

Expect moderate prices, Alvarez said, from $2 oysters to $13 to $19 for shared plates.

Rooster & the Till partners met while working at Mise en Place when Alvarez was chef de cuisine, Ty Rodriguez was general manager and Brian Lampe was a sous chef.

Café DuFrain on Harbour Island was the next stop for the three men who worked there about four years.

In March, they set out to create their own farm-to-table restaurant in Seminole Heights, where they all reside.

The 36-seat building, designed by Jaime Rogers of Doxa, displays their commitment to sustainability of natural resources.

"One wall is built of old wood fencing we gathered ourselves in the neighborhood," Alvarez said. A 16-foot bar made of reclaimed cypress and pine faces into the open kitchen.

Boutique wines and craft beers are offered, including after-work and late-night happy hour specials.

Rooster & the Till, 6500 N Florida Ave., will be open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays, later on weekends. Visit roosterandthetill.com or call (813) 374-8940.

Pitas, pizza and wings at Lala's

Lala's Gyros brings quick-service pita sandwiches, pizza, wings and salads to Kennedy Boulevard near Howard Avenue. It's not a big stretch for owner Salim Sorathia, nicknamed La La, who also owns Salem's Gyros & Subs, seven blocks east.

LaLa's short menu features gyros, subs and salads loaded with a choice of chicken, steak, turkey, ham, tuna and such. Boneless chicken wings are 50 for $29.99, with Buffalo-style offered on Fridays. A platter of 25 Cuban sandwich bites costs $19.99.

Lala's Gyros, 2618 W Kennedy Blvd., is open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 6 p.m. to midnight, Friday and Saturday; call (813) 877-LALA (5252).

Newest Firehouse Subs opens

Right across the street from LaLa's, the fast-casual Firehouse Subs opened Thursday in a former after-hours pediatric office on Kennedy Boulevard. The franchise, founded nearly 10 years ago by firemen in Jacksonville, is know for submarine sandwiches piled with a half-pound of premium meats and cheeses and for its nonprofit public safety foundation supporting emergency service providers.

Favorite subs are named for fire trucks: the Hook & Ladder (smoked turkey and ham smothered in Monterey Jack cheese) and the New York Steamer, corned beef brisket and pastrami topped with provolone.) Salads and chili round out the menu. Catering is also available.

Firehouse Subs, 2617 W Kennedy Blvd., is open 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday to Thursday; until 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Visit firehousesubs.com or call (813) 443-0998.

Do you know something that should be Everybody's Business? Call (813) 226-3332 or email ascherzer@tampabay.com.

Rooster & the Till to crow soon in Seminole Heights 11/20/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 3:53pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Pinellas licensing board asks Sen. Jack Latvala for $500,000 loan

    Local Government

    The troubled Pinellas County agency that regulates contractors wants Sen. Jack Latvala to help it get a $500,000 lifeline from the state to stay afloat.

    State Sen . Jack Latvala, R- Clearwater, is being asked to help the Pinellas County Construction Licensing Board get $500,000 from the state so it can stay open beyond February.  [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
  2. In advertising, marketing diversity needs a boost in Tampa Bay, nationally

    Business

    TAMPA — Trimeka Benjamin was focused on a career in broadcast journalism when she entered Bethune-Cookman University.

    From left, Swim Digital marketing owner Trimeka Benjamin discusses the broad lack of diversity in advertising and marketing with 22 Squared copywriter Luke Sokolewicz, University of Tampa advertising/PR professor Jennifer Whelihan, Rumbo creative director George Zwierko and Nancy Vaughn of the White Book Agency. The group recently met at The Bunker in Ybor City.
  3. Tampa Club president seeks assessment fee from members

    News

    TAMPA — The president of the Tampa Club said he asked members last month to pay an additional assessment fee to provide "additional revenue." However, Ron Licata said Friday that the downtown business group is not in a dire financial situation.

    Ron Licata, president of the Tampa Club in downtown Tampa. [Tampa Club]
  4. Under Republican health care bill, Florida must make up $7.5 billion

    Markets

    If a Senate bill called the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 becomes law, Florida's government would need to make up about $7.5 billion to maintain its current health care system. The bill, which is one of the Republican Party's long-promised answers to the Affordable Care Act imposes a cap on funding per enrollee …

    Florida would need to cover $7.5 billion to keep its health care program under the Republican-proposed Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017.  [Times file photo]
  5. Amid U.S. real estate buying binge by foreign investors, Florida remains first choice

    Real Estate

    Foreign investment in U.S. residential real estate recently skyrocketed to a new high with nearly half of all foreign sales happening in Florida, California and Texas.

    A National Association of Realtors annual survey found record volume and activity by foreign buyers of U.S. real estate. Florida had the highest foreign investment activity, followed by California and Texas. [National Association of Realtors]