Make us your home page
Instagram

Times journalists win a first-place honor and nine overall in the National Headliner Awards

Tampa Bay Times journalists won a first-place award and nine overall in the 82nd annual National Headliner Awards competition honoring excellent journalism in U.S. news organizations during 2015.

Book critic Colette Bancroft won first place in the newspaper division category of special/feature column on one subject for her pieces on three women authors: a tribute to Louisa May Alcott's Little Women; a review of Harper Lee's Go Set A Watchman; and a review of Margo Jefferson's Negroland: A Memoir.

In the public service category, Times staff writers Michael LaForgia, Cara Fitzpatrick and Lisa Gartner won the second-place award for the "Failure Factories" series that traced the decline of schools in St. Petersburg's black neighborhoods.

Also winning second-place awards were:

• Leonora LaPeter Anton, Anthony Cormier and Michael Braga in investigative reporting for the Times/Herald-Tribune series "Insane. Invisible. In danger" on Florida's state-funded mental hospitals. That series also won second place in online videography for video led by photographer John Pendygraft.

• Editor of editorials Tim Nickens in editorial writing for a collection that included the subjects of health care and Medicaid expansion.

• Food critic Laura Reiley in the special/feature column category for pieces on food waste, dietary guidelines and beer hall etiquette.

• Illustrator Cameron Cottrill in illustration/informational graphics for a collection that included art for Latitudes and Perspective cover stories.

• Tampabay.com in the category of newspaper affiliated website.

Winning third place:

• Sports columnist Tom Jones in sports columns for a collection that included commentary on Marty St. Louis retiring and Jameis Winston's first win for the Bucs.

Founded in 1934 by the Press Club of Atlantic City, the National Headliner Awards program is one of the oldest and largest annual national contests recognizing journalistic merit in the communications industry.

Times journalists win a first-place honor and nine overall in the National Headliner Awards 04/08/16 [Last modified: Friday, April 8, 2016 5:45pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Federal agencies demand records from SeaWorld theme park

    Tourism

    ORLANDO — Two federal agencies are reportedly demanding financial records from SeaWorld.

    Killer whales Ikaika and Corky participate in behaviors commonly done in the wild during SeaWorld's Killer Whale educational presentation in this photo from Jan. 9. SeaWorld has been subpoenaed by two federal agencies for comments that executives and the company made in August 2014 about the impact from the "Blackfish" documentary. 
[Nelvin C. Cepeda/San Diego Union-Tribune/TNS]
  2. Legalized medical marijuana signed into law by Rick Scott

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed into law a broader medical marijuana system for the state, following through on a promise he made earlier this month.

    Gov. Rick Scott signed legislation on Friday that legalizes medical marijuana in Florida.
  3. Line of moms welcome Once Upon A Child to Carrollwood

    Business

    CARROLLWOOD — Strollers of all shapes and sizes are lined up in front of the store, and inside, there are racks of children's clothing in every color of the rainbow.

    At Once Upon A Child, you often as many baby strollers outside as you find baby furniture and accessories. It recently opened this location in Carrollwood. Photo by Danielle Hauser
  4. Pastries N Chaat brings North India cuisine to North Tampa

    Business

    TAMPA — Pastries N Chaat, a new restaurant offering Indian street food, opened this week near the University of South Florida.

    The menu at Pastries N Chaat includes a large variety of Biriyani, an entree owners say is beloved by millions. Photo courtesy of Pastries N Chaat.
  5. 'Garbage juice' seen as threat to drinking water in Florida Panhandle county

    Water

    To Waste Management, the nation's largest handler of garbage, the liquid that winds up at the bottom of a landfill is called "leachate," and it can safely be disposed of in a well that's 4,200 feet deep.

    Three samples that were displayed by Jackson County NAACP President Ronstance Pittman at a public meeting on Waste Management's deep well injection proposal. The sample on the left is full of leachate from the Jackson County landfill, the stuff that would be injected into the well. The sample on the right shows leachate after it's been treated at a wastewater treatment plant. The one in the middle is tap water.