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Times mental hospital investigation wins APME awards

Tonya Cook, one of the subjects in the investigation by the Times and Herald-Tribune, poses with a police evidence photo taken the day she was attacked during her shift at North Florida Evaluation and Treatment Center in 2012. "Everybody knows when you go to work in that environment you are never 100 percent safe," Cook says. "There's no security in these buildings at all...there aren't a lot of people who want to work there anymore because of the way these places are run." [
JOHN PENDYGRAFT | Times]

Tonya Cook, one of the subjects in the investigation by the Times and Herald-Tribune, poses with a police evidence photo taken the day she was attacked during her shift at North Florida Evaluation and Treatment Center in 2012. "Everybody knows when you go to work in that environment you are never 100 percent safe," Cook says. "There's no security in these buildings at all...there aren't a lot of people who want to work there anymore because of the way these places are run." [ JOHN PENDYGRAFT | Times]

The Tampa Bay Times and Sarasota Herald-Tribune Thursday won top honors in the Associated Press Media Editors Innovation in Journalism Awards for a joint investigation exposing violence and neglect in Florida's state-run mental hospitals.

The series — "Insane. Invisible. In danger." — was named best-in-show for public service journalism. It also won the Al Neuharth Award for Innovation in Investigative Reporting.

Reporters at the two papers spent more than a year uncovering how $100 million in budget cuts and a pattern of neglect created warehouses of violence where deaths and physical attacks spiked.

Last month, Times reporters Leonora LaPeter Anton and Anthony Cormier and Herald-Tribune reporter Michael Braga received the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting last month for the series.

Times mental hospital investigation wins APME awards 05/19/16 [Last modified: Thursday, May 19, 2016 7:23pm]
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