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Tobacco maker's ads tout benefits of going smokeless

An R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. advertisement promotes Camel Snus smokeless tobacco product. The small white pouches are filled with tobacco, and users stick the product between their cheek and gum. Critics say the campaign takes advantage of people who may make New Year’s resolutions to quit smoking by steering them toward another tobacco product.

Associated Press/Reynolds American Inc.

An R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. advertisement promotes Camel Snus smokeless tobacco product. The small white pouches are filled with tobacco, and users stick the product between their cheek and gum. Critics say the campaign takes advantage of people who may make New Year’s resolutions to quit smoking by steering them toward another tobacco product.

RALEIGH, N.C. — R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. is targeting people who resolve to quit smoking in the new year with advertisements suggesting they switch to its smokeless tobacco pouches, a move critics say is an attempt to keep people from quitting nicotine.

The ads mark the company's first campaign aimed at getting smokers to switch to the pouches known as Snus, which Reynolds introduced in early 2009, spokesman David Howard said Wednesday.

The carefully worded ads suggest, but don't say directly, that the pouches are a way to help kick the smoking habit. Under federal law, companies cannot claim that tobacco products work as smoking-cessation products. But tobacco companies would love for smokers to think of them that way as cigarette sales fall because of higher taxes, smoking bans and falling social acceptability.

The No. 2 U.S. cigarette maker is advertising in major magazines this month its suggestion for a "2011 Smoke-Free Resolution" in ads showing the white pouches dropping from the sky like confetti. The ads promote the company's Camel Snus — small pouches filled with tobacco that users stick between the cheek and gum.

"If you've decided to quit tobacco use, we support you. But if you're looking for smoke-free, spit-free, drama-free tobacco pleasure, Camel Snus is your answer. … It might just change the way you enjoy tobacco," one ad says.

The "resolution" ads appeared in wide-circulation magazines including Time, Sports Illustrated and People, Howard said. Two other versions, which specifically address themselves to smokers, appeared in alternative weekly newspapers around the country, he said. Those ads feature the product at the heart of snowflakes or ringed into a holiday wreath.

All three ads also warn: "Smokeless tobacco is addictive."

An anti-tobacco campaigner said the Reynolds ads aim to reorient smokers to smokeless Snus to keep them from being lost as potential customers.

"These ads are trying to take advantage of the fact that around the first of every year many people try to quit smoking altogether. These ads aren't designed to help people quit; they're designed to keep people using tobacco," said Matthew Myers, president of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

The Food And Drug Administration, which regulates tobacco advertising, is reviewing the Reynolds ad campaign. The agency is charged under the Tobacco Control Act with deciding if any tobacco ads make false claims.

"The claims made by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.'s advertising and labeling materials are being evaluated by the FDA," spokesman Jeff Ventura said.

About 46 million American adults, or one in five, still smoke and about the same number are former smokers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That's down from one out of four Americans who smoked in 1995.

About 3 percent of American adults use smokeless tobacco.

The CDC says smokeless tobacco contains 28 cancer-causing agents and is not a safe substitute for smoking cigarettes.

Tobacco maker's ads tout benefits of going smokeless 12/30/10 [Last modified: Monday, November 7, 2011 1:51pm]
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