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What could be tougher to crack than an iPhone? Apple engineers

SAN FRANCISCO — If the FBI wins its court fight to force Apple's help in unlocking an iPhone, the agency may run into yet another roadblock: Apple's engineers.

Apple employees are discussing what they will do if ordered to help law enforcement authorities. Some say they may balk at the work, while others may even quit their high-paying jobs rather than undermine the security of the software they have created, more than a half-dozen current and former Apple employees told the New York Times.

Among those interviewed were Apple engineers who are involved in the development of mobile products and security, as well as former security engineers and executives.

The potential resistance adds a wrinkle to a very public fight between Apple, the world's most valuable company, and the authorities over access to an iPhone used by one of the attackers in the December mass killing in San Bernardino, Calif.

It also speaks directly to arguments Apple has made in legal documents that the government's demand curbs free speech by asking the company to order people to do things that they consider offensive.

"Such conscription is fundamentally offensive to Apple's core principles and would pose a severe threat to the autonomy of Apple and its engineers," Apple's lawyers wrote in the company's final brief to the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.

The employees' concerns also provide insight into a company culture that despite the trappings of Silicon Valley wealth still views the world through the decades-old, anti-establishment prism of co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak.

Tim Cook, Apple's chief executive, last month telegraphed what his employees might do in an email to customers: "The same engineers who built strong encryption into the iPhone to protect our users would, ironically, be ordered to weaken those protections and make our users less safe," Cook wrote.

Apple declined to comment.

What could be tougher to crack than an iPhone? Apple engineers 03/17/16 [Last modified: Thursday, March 17, 2016 10:27pm]
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