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Whole body cryotherapy clinic now in Brandon

Amy Gonzalez, a breast and cervical cancer survivor who has lupus, chose Brandon to open the first CRYOPY whole body cryotherapy business in the Tampa Bay area. Cryotherapy promises to treat a broad range of conditions by entering a liquid nitrogen chamber that reaches temperatures of approximately minus 250. Photo by Eric Vician

Amy Gonzalez, a breast and cervical cancer survivor who has lupus, chose Brandon to open the first CRYOPY whole body cryotherapy business in the Tampa Bay area. Cryotherapy promises to treat a broad range of conditions by entering a liquid nitrogen chamber that reaches temperatures of approximately minus 250. Photo by Eric Vician

BRANDON — Cryotherapy promises to treat a broad range of conditions such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, joint pain, muscle pain, skin rejuvenation and general fatigue. Despite not being FDA approved, the treatment is good enough for star athletes such as Kobe Bryant, LeBron James and Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Now, you can try it yourself as CRYOPY, a whole body cryotherapy clinic, has opened its first location in the Tampa Bay area at 210 S Parsons Ave., Suite 3. Owner Amy Gonzalez, a breast and cervical cancer survivor who has lupus, opened the business in March at the urging of her boyfriend, Dan Mathis.

"It works for me," said Gonzalez, who was a sales insurance agent before opening CRYOPY. "Some people feel it immediately because their body is going through healthy healing. It's a holistic, natural way of feeling better."

Gonzalez and Mathis are among four trained coaches from the chamber's manufacturer, M-Cryo, who stay with patients during the 1-3 minute session. They step into a whole body cryotherapy chamber for the first time wearing nothing but gloves and socks (and boxers if you are male) as the temperature falls to minus 250 degrees.

Gonzalez says the lowest temperature ever recorded on earth is approximately minus 135 on Antarctica.

The effects last for up to eight hours and directly affect your capillaries, red blood cells and endorphins, said Gonzalez.

Gonzalez treats herself to the liquid nitrogen cold every other day but recommends newcomers start with a twice-a-week program. Introductory sessions are $45, half the regular single session cost. Packages also are available starting with five sessions for $250 and ranging up to 20 sessions for $800.

Several more CRYOPY locations are planned throughout Tampa Bay.

"It's going to be in the American mainstream I believe," Gonzalez said.

Book online at cryopy.com or call (813) 370-0116.

SHARE YOUR NEWS: If you have an item for Everybody's Business, contact Arielle Waldman at awaldman@tampabay.com.

Whole body cryotherapy clinic now in Brandon 04/15/16 [Last modified: Friday, April 15, 2016 11:31am]
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