Make us your home page
Instagram

Whole body cryotherapy clinic now in Brandon

Amy Gonzalez, a breast and cervical cancer survivor who has lupus, chose Brandon to open the first CRYOPY whole body cryotherapy business in the Tampa Bay area. Cryotherapy promises to treat a broad range of conditions by entering a liquid nitrogen chamber that reaches temperatures of approximately minus 250. Photo by Eric Vician

Amy Gonzalez, a breast and cervical cancer survivor who has lupus, chose Brandon to open the first CRYOPY whole body cryotherapy business in the Tampa Bay area. Cryotherapy promises to treat a broad range of conditions by entering a liquid nitrogen chamber that reaches temperatures of approximately minus 250. Photo by Eric Vician

BRANDON — Cryotherapy promises to treat a broad range of conditions such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, joint pain, muscle pain, skin rejuvenation and general fatigue. Despite not being FDA approved, the treatment is good enough for star athletes such as Kobe Bryant, LeBron James and Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Now, you can try it yourself as CRYOPY, a whole body cryotherapy clinic, has opened its first location in the Tampa Bay area at 210 S Parsons Ave., Suite 3. Owner Amy Gonzalez, a breast and cervical cancer survivor who has lupus, opened the business in March at the urging of her boyfriend, Dan Mathis.

"It works for me," said Gonzalez, who was a sales insurance agent before opening CRYOPY. "Some people feel it immediately because their body is going through healthy healing. It's a holistic, natural way of feeling better."

Gonzalez and Mathis are among four trained coaches from the chamber's manufacturer, M-Cryo, who stay with patients during the 1-3 minute session. They step into a whole body cryotherapy chamber for the first time wearing nothing but gloves and socks (and boxers if you are male) as the temperature falls to minus 250 degrees.

Gonzalez says the lowest temperature ever recorded on earth is approximately minus 135 on Antarctica.

The effects last for up to eight hours and directly affect your capillaries, red blood cells and endorphins, said Gonzalez.

Gonzalez treats herself to the liquid nitrogen cold every other day but recommends newcomers start with a twice-a-week program. Introductory sessions are $45, half the regular single session cost. Packages also are available starting with five sessions for $250 and ranging up to 20 sessions for $800.

Several more CRYOPY locations are planned throughout Tampa Bay.

"It's going to be in the American mainstream I believe," Gonzalez said.

Book online at cryopy.com or call (813) 370-0116.

SHARE YOUR NEWS: If you have an item for Everybody's Business, contact Arielle Waldman at [email protected]

Whole body cryotherapy clinic now in Brandon 04/15/16 [Last modified: Friday, April 15, 2016 11:31am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Regulator blasts Wells Fargo for deceptive auto insurance program

    Banking

    Wells Fargo engaged in unfair and deceptive practices, failed to properly manage risks and hasn't set aside enough money to pay back the customers it harmed, according to a confidential report by federal regulators.

    Wells Fargo engaged in unfair and deceptive practices, failed to properly manage risks and hasn't set aside enough money to pay back the customers it harmed, according to a confidential report by federal regulators.
[Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images, 2017]
  2. McDonald's soft serve in Florida is made with handshakes and happy cows

    Consumer

    Floridians licked nine million McDonald's vanilla cones last year.

    Calves play with a rubber toy at the Milking R Dairy in Okeechobee, FL. Owners Sutton Rucks, Jr., and his wife Kris Rucks sell their milk to SouthEast Dairies cooperative, Edward Coryn of Dairy Mix in St. Petersburg buys it, transforms it into soft-serve ice cream base, and sells it to all the McDonald's. SCOTT KEELER   |   Times

  3. Hurricane Irma thrashed Tampa Bay homes sales in September

    Real Estate

    Hurricane Irma not only downed thousands of trees throughout the Tampa Bay area: It also sent home sales plunging in September.

    This home on Tampa's Davis Islands home sold in September for $5.2 million, making it the priciest sale of the month in the Tampa Bay area.
[Courtesy of Judson Brady Photography]
  4. Florida unemployment rate drops despite huge loss of jobs

    Economic Development

    Florida lost a whopping 127,400 jobs last month as Hurricane Irma swept through, according to state figures released Friday.

    Florida's unemployment rate dropped from 4 percent in August to 3.8 percent in September. Pictured is 
Shantia Blackmon (left),from St. Petersburg, talking with Jocelyn Kelley from North Carolina at a Pinellas Schools County Job Fair in June. | [DIRK SHADD   |   Times]
  5. Hooper: Jean Chatzky chats about the intersection of wealth, health

    Personal Finance

    Public safety officials can readily identify a city's most dangerous intersections.

    Personal finance adviser Jean Chatzky is one of several high profile speakers on the slate for the Women's Conference of Florida in Tampa next week. [Handout photo]