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Better job market seen for 2011

WASHINGTON — Far fewer people are applying for unemployment benefits as the year ends, raising hopes for a healthier job market in 2011.

Applications are at their lowest level since July 2008, the Labor Department said Thursday. They fell to 388,000 in the week ending Dec. 25, bringing the four-week average to 414,000. Until mid October, the four-week average had been stuck above 450,000 most of the year.

Economists say the number of people applying for unemployment benefits predicts where the job market will go over the next few months — so much so that they use this data to help forecast economic growth.

"We're starting to see a pickup in job growth," said Conference Board economist Kenneth Goldstein. "We may even get to a point, conceivably by spring, where the consumer is going to say that it no longer feels like we're still in a recession." He expects the economy to generate 100,000 to 150,000 jobs a month by spring, up from an average 86,500 a month in 2010.

That's an improvement, but still not enough to cause a big drop in the unemployment rate. To Paul Kasriel, chief economist at Northern Trust, fewer people applying for unemployment benefits suggests the unemployment rate will slip from 9.8 percent in November to 9.7 percent early next year; that would mean about 150,000 fewer unemployed.

The good news is that layoffs have fallen back to pre-recession levels. In October, 1.7 million people were laid off or fired — the lowest figure since August 2006, more than a year before the Great Recession started. Layoffs and dismissals peaked at 2.6 million in January 2009.

In past downturns, the economy didn't start generating jobs until applications for unemployment benefits consistently fell below 400,000 a week. But some economists say the old rule of thumb is outdated. Payrolls were already growing this year when applications were still well above 450,000 a week.

One reason: The labor force has grown by 25 million people over the past two decades. "You would expect the level of initial jobless claims to be higher the larger the labor force," Northern Trust's Kasriel said.

Even if they've stopped cutting, employers have been slow to hire. In October, there were still 4.4 unemployed for every job opening. "It's not really been the layoff rate that's been the problem in most of 2010," said Gary Burtless, senior fellow in economics studies at the Brookings Institution. "It's been the failure of employers to create vacancies."

But vacancies are expected to open up in 2011. A survey released this month by the Business Roundtable found that 45 percent of big company chief executives planned to add jobs over the next six months, up from 31 percent in the third quarter; just 18 percent planned to cut jobs.

"We're going to start to see jobs added. It's just going to take longer than anyone would want to get to somewhere more comfortable," said Manpower CEO Jeff Joerres. "The first quarter is classically a slow hiring quarter. After that, we're going to see numbers that seem more like a recovery."

Pending home sales rise

The National Association of Realtors said Thursday its index of sales agreements for previously occupied homes increased 3.5 percent last month from a downwardly revised reading in October. Contract signings were up in the West and Northeast, but down in the South and Midwest. A third of the pending sales likely will be foreclosures or short sales, where a homeowner sells a house for less than what is owed on it, association spokesman Walter Molony said. Many economists expect home prices to drop an additional 5 to 10 percent in the next six months before stabilizing.

Better job market seen for 2011 12/30/10 [Last modified: Monday, November 7, 2011 1:51pm]
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