Make us your home page
Instagram

Bosses share workers' ridiculous reasons for being late

From escaped zebras to must-see TV, employers share some of the most unique excuses they've heard from tardy employees in a recent CareerBuilder study. The study also finds that nearly one quarter of employees (23 percent) admit to being tardy at least once a month on average, with 15 percent admitting to arriving late at least once a week.

Running a little late could have big repercussions. One in three employers (35 percent) have fired an employee for tardiness, and 48 percent of employers expect their employees to be on time every day. Thirty-four percent say they allow employees to be late every once in a while, as long as tardiness doesn't become a pattern, and 18 percent don't care how their employees manage their time, just that they get their work done well.

"Most employers understand that occasionally things pop up and cause employees to be behind schedule. The trouble comes when tardiness becomes a habit," said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder.

Some roadblocks tend to occur more often than others. Traffic remains the most common reason employees say they're late (39 percent), followed by lack of sleep (19 percent), problems with public transportation (8 percent), bad weather (7 percent) and dropping the kids off at day care or school (6 percent).

Some employees don't stick with the common excuses for their tardiness. Employers shared some of the most memorable excuses they've received from employees who were running late, including:

• Employee claimed a zebra was running down the highway and held up traffic (turned out to be true)

• Employee woke up on the front lawn of a house two blocks away from his home

• Employee's cat got stuck in the toilet

• Employee couldn't eat breakfast — he ran out of milk for cereal and had to buy some before getting ready for work

• Employee was late to work because he fell asleep in the car when he got to work

• Employee accidentally put super glue in her eye instead of contact lens solution, and had to go to the emergency room

• Employee thought Halloween was a work holiday

• Employee said a hole in the roof caused rain to fall on the alarm clock and it didn't go off

• Employee was watching something on TV and really wanted to see the end

• Employee forgot that the company had changed locations

• Employee got a hairbrush stuck in her hair

• Employee was scared by a nightmare

Bosses share workers' ridiculous reasons for being late 03/17/14 [Last modified: Monday, March 17, 2014 5:54pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Lost Highway: As FHP struggles to recruit, speeding tickets plummet

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — The number of speeding tickets written by Florida state troopers has plunged three straight years as the agency grapples with a personnel shortage and high turnover.

    A Florida Highway Patrol Academy class in the late 1980s. Typically, graduating classes had about 80 recruits. But the most recent class has less than half that as the agency continues to struggle to fill vacancies. [

Florida: Highway Patrol]
  2. Kidpreneurs — and adults — capitalize on gooey, squishy Slime craze

    Retail

    First it was Play-Doh. Then Gak. There have been dozens of variations for sale of the oozy, gooey, squishable, stretchable kids' toy through the generations.

    Aletheia Venator and Berlyn Perdomo demonstrate the stretchiness of their slime. - Berlyn Perdomo and her friend, Aletheia Venator, both 13, make and sell slime which can be seen on their instagram site @the.real.slimeshadyy [JIM DAMASKE   |   Times]
  3. The last farmer of Florida's prized Zellwood corn is thinking of packing it in

    Consumer

    MOUNT DORA — Hank Scott steps out of his pickup between the long rows and snaps off an ear that grows about bellybutton-high on the forehead-high stalks.

    Hank Scott, co-owner of Long and Scott Farms, shucks an ear of corn on the farm in Mount Dora, Fla., on Wednesday, May 10, 2017. The farm specializes in Scott's Zellwood Triple-Sweet Gourmet Corn. LOREN ELLIOTT   |   Times
  4. Law firm's Russia ties prove nothing about Trump

    Business

    The statement

    "Law firm @POTUS used to show he has no ties to Russia was named Russia Law Firm of the Year for their extensive ties to Russia. Unreal."

    Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., stands during a media availability on Capitol Hill, Monday, June 20, 2016 in Washington. A divided Senate blocked rival election-year plans to curb guns on Monday, eight days after the horror of Orlando's mass shooting intensified pressure on lawmakers to act but knotted them in gridlock anyway — even over restricting firearms for terrorists. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  5. Pasco county lawyer disbarred for taking woman's money

    Real Estate

    NEW PORT RICHEY — The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday disbarred Pasco County attorney and former congressional candidate Constantine Kalogianis.

    The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday disbarred Pasco County attorney and former congressional candidate Constantine Kalogianis. 
[2016 booking photo via Pasco County Sheriff's Office]