Make us your home page
Instagram

Camps for adults help workers recharge

A year ago, Joseph Dawson, a communications manager at a South Florida biotech company, sat at his work computer dreaming about connecting with musicians who shared his passion for rock music. So Dawson jetted to Las Vegas, where he spent a week playing drums at a rock 'n' roll fantasy camp with other working professionals looking to escape their routine. "It was kind of like self-help group therapy," Dawson said. "It changed me on a level I didn't expect."

With time demands and stress levels rising, U.S. workers are desperate to connect with others who feel trapped in the same dynamics. Camps for adults have become increasingly popular as an antidote to workplace stress, offering workers a weekend or weeklong opportunity to unplug their devices, recharge their personal batteries, re-evaluate priorities and experience much-needed camaraderie.

Stress experts say building bonds with others in a completely new environment encourages positive thinking and resilience. "The brain is hardwired that we must have a tribe or community in order to survive in this very challenging world," said Heidi Hanna, CEO of Synergy Solutions and author of Stressaholic. "Social support not only boosts optimism, it makes challenges appear less difficult."

For Dawson, 32, rocking out with rock legends like KISS' Ace Frehley and Alice Cooper was decidedly cool. But the deeper experience came from bonding with bandmates who were strangers just the week before. Dawson has stayed in touch with all of them — insurance agents, doctors, IT experts, all tethered by a common love of music. He said they support each other's lives outside work, even traveling to attend performances.

According to Grownup Camps.com, there are more than 800 adult camps in the United States, most of them operating throughout the year. They tout the draw of the adult camp experience as an opportunity to break free of routine, learn something new, make new friends and have fun. The American Camp Association says it expects interest in adult camps to continue to grow.

David Fishof launched Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy Camp in Doral more than a decade ago to appeal to the booming population of rock-star wanna-bes. He since has secured a permanent location for his fantasy camp in Las Vegas and just entered talks to open a second location in Florida. The camps pair attendees with professional musicians and bandmates and range in price from $299 for a one-day rock-star experience to $1,699 for two days of Rock Camp 101 to $5,495 for a four-day headliner package. Campers write and record their own songs in a professional recording studio and finish with a live performance.

Fishof said campers leave with better work and life skills. "They learn to listen. What makes them successful in a band is to listen to what the other person is playing. So many people forget success is in teams."

Like Fishof, Tammi Leader Fuller, 54, became aware of the dynamics behind the adult camp trend and now runs Campowerment, a combination of fun and games and empowerment workshops. Fuller calls it a place where women who are struggling to juggle all that life throws at them can unwind in a group setting.

"A lot of women have hit a wall," Fuller said. "They want to know others are experiencing what they are feeling." Fuller said camp rules are that campers can't talk about what they do for a living for the first 24 hours. "Sweat pants, we have learned, are the great equalizer."

In between bonfires and sing-alongs, the women learn journaling, vision-board making and stress-management skills. Fuller runs the camps at kids' sleep-away properties around the country.

Camp organizers are discovering that even the young generation of workers sees the benefit of breaking away from the modern world for a camp experience. Levi Felix, 29, co-founded Digital Detox in 2012 to lead device-free retreats and programs. He has hosted more than 15 three-day retreats for people who feel addicted to their gadgets. For 72 hours, the participants eat vegan food, practice yoga, swim in a nearby creek, take long walks in the woods and keep a journal about being offline.

While the goal is to re-energize, the real advantage, camp organizers say, are the coping abilities that help upon return to former routines. Said Fuller: "Everyone leaves with the tools to live the lives they want and a new sense of purpose."

Camps for adults help workers recharge 02/13/14 [Last modified: Thursday, February 20, 2014 6:17pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Tribune News Service.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Carrollwood fitness center employs scientific protocol to help clients

    Business

    In 2005, Al Roach and Virginia Phillips, husband and wife, opened 20 Minutes to Fitness in Lakewood Ranch, and last month they opened the doors to their new location in Carrollwood.

    Preston Fisher, a personal fitness coach at 20 Minutes To Fitness, stands with an iPad while general manager/owner Angela Begin conducts an equipment demonstration. The iPad is used to track each client's information and progress. I also included one shot of just the equipment. The center recently opened in Carrollwood. Photo by Danielle Hauser.
  2. Olive Tree branches out to Wesley Chapel

    Business

    WESLEY CHAPEL — When it came time to open a second location of The Olive Tree, owners John and Donna Woelfel, decided that Wesley Chapel was the perfect place.

    The Olive Tree expands its offerings of "ultra premium?€ extra virgin olive oils (EVOO) to a second location in Wesley Chapel. Photo by Danielle Hauser.
  3. Massachusetts firm buys Tampa's Element apartment tower

    Real Estate

    TAMPA — Downtown Tampa's Element apartment tower sold this week to a Massachusetts-based real estate investment company that plans to upgrade the skyscraper's amenities and operate it long-term as a rental community.

    The Element apartment high-rise at 808 N Franklin St. in downtown Tampa has been sold to a Northland Investment Corp., a Massachusetts-based real estate investment company. JIM DAMASKE  |  Times
  4. New York town approves Legoland proposal

    News

    GOSHEN, N.Y. — New York is one step closer to a Lego dreamland. Goshen, a small town about fifty miles northwest of the Big Apple, has approved the site plan for a $500 million Legoland amusement park.

    A small New York town, Goshen approved the site plan for a $500 million Legoland amusement park. Legoland Florida is in Winter Haven. [Times file  photo]
  5. Jordan Park to get $20 million makeover and new senior housing

    Real Estate

    By WAVENEY ANN MOORE

    Times Staff Writer

    ST. PETERSBURG —The St. Petersburg Housing Authority, which bought back the troubled Jordan Park public housing complex this year, plans to spend about $20 million to improve the 237-unit property and construct a new three-story building for …

    Jordan Park, the historic public housing complex, is back in the hands of the St. Petersburg Housing Authority. The agency is working to improve the 237-unit complex. But the latest plan to build a new three-story building for seniors will mean 31 families have to find new homes. [LARA CERRI   |   Tampa Bay Times]