Tuesday, June 19, 2018
Business

Can you take your current skills to a new career?

If you spend your weekdays counting down the minutes until you get to the weekend — you're not alone.

Only 13 percent of people feel a sense of passion or a deep connection to their work, while 63 percent are unhappy — or disengaged, according to an October report by Gallup. It's possible, however, to use the skills you've already got and apply them to a new career.

Rachael Silvers began a photography business in 2001 after launching a successful photography website, shooting a total of more than 350 weddings throughout the country and around the world, from Illinois to Greece to California.

"I continued to hone my sales skills and to promote myself and my business, adding a videography component as well," Silvers said. "During this time, marketing on the Internet continued to grow, and the social media aspect took off. I added a blog, got lost in the Twitter-sphere and joined a few amazing digital wedding and portrait photographer forums, attended conferences, networked and learned to promote myself and my business on Facebook."

But when the economic downturn hit her business, Silvers took her social media skills to a new field.

"I was fortunate enough that employers were looking for dedicated staff members to grow their brand across social media platforms, and I knew, from previous experience, how to sell myself and my skill set," said Silvers, who was hired to be a social media, marketing and public relations coordinator for a California furniture rental company. She switched again to land a job as a marketing manager for a small financial advisory firm.

Most people, however, can't figure out how to seamlessly apply their skills to other careers and for that, there's help, said Diana Gruverman, director of employer relations at New York University's Wasserman Center for Career Development. "You have to figure out what industries are aligned with your strengths."

The first step is to check out onetcodeconnector.org, which breaks down occupations into the tasks required to those jobs. It also explains the pros and cons for each industry, as well as a day in a life of each job, Gruverman said.

Once you think you have an idea of a new career, set up informational interviews with people who are already in those careers. "Learn about what does and doesn't sound exciting and engaging," she said.

Finally, start networking by talking to those in the industry, and updating your LinkedIn accounts. "Candidates are getting screened that way and are getting job interviews," she said.

Sometimes, you can't simply apply your skills to a new field — and you'll have to go back to school to change careers.

Amanda Zayde of New York started her career by working in advertising for several national art publications, but decided to switch careers to become a clinical psychologist because she found herself drawn to her clients' life stories.

She did three years of additional course-work, a one-year internship and a year of postdoctoral before she successfully made the switch.

"My former career required me to have a nuanced understanding of art in addition to being a trusted adviser to my clients," Zayde said. "I use my former skills every single day. It helps that I know about art because I am able to offer my patients many different mediums in which to express their internal experience."

Still, the approach of using one's skills and applying them to another career doesn't always work, said Andrea Kay, an Ohio-based career consultant and author of six career books.

"A lot of what you may do well, such as writing or working well with others or analyzing data doesn't necessarily fit neatly in a job description in a new career," she said.

In addition to looking at your skills, she suggests that you complete the sentences to figure determine how to best maneuver a career change: "I really want to __" and "I just know there is a job that uses my skills to __."

Comments
St. Petersburg residents will see higher water, sanitation bills

St. Petersburg residents will see higher water, sanitation bills

ST. PETERSBURG — Residents can expect their water and sanitation bills to increase between $7 and $11 starting in October.That represents an average of a 7-percent increase. Customers who use an average of 4,000 gallons a month, including reclaimed w...
Published: 06/19/18
Spectrum’s new service will eventually increase the cost for TV

Spectrum’s new service will eventually increase the cost for TV

Spectrum’s new all-digital service is set to bring more high definition, faster internet speeds and expanded on-demand offerings — but it also comes with higher costs for some of its TV customers in Tampa Bay. Each TV that receives service from Spect...
Published: 06/19/18
Pasco Business Digest for June 22

Pasco Business Digest for June 22

Business digestBrieflyHOSPITALS RECEIVE AWARD: Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point and Medical Center of Trinity were recipients of Healthgrades 2018 Patient Safety Excellence Award, a designation that recognizes superior performance of hospitals t...
Updated: 3 hours ago

Hernando Business Digest for June 22

Business digestBrieflyHOSPITAL RECEIVES AWARD: Oak Hill Hospital in Spring Hill was the recipient of Healthgrades 2018 Patient Safety Excellence Award, a designation that recognizes superior performance of hospitals that have prevented the occurrence...
Updated: 3 hours ago
Private Florida firm buys Rent-A-Center in $1 billion deal

Private Florida firm buys Rent-A-Center in $1 billion deal

An Orlando private equity firm has purchased lease-to-own business Rent-A-Center in a deal valued at more than $1 billion.Vintage Capital Management put a bid in for the company on Friday: $15 per share, $1 per share above its previous offer. Rent-A-...
Published: 06/18/18
Report: 40 percent of Florida property will be ‘highly exposed’ to flooding

Report: 40 percent of Florida property will be ‘highly exposed’ to flooding

One of Florida’s biggest draws is also one if its biggest liabilities — its coastline. A new report projects that Florida is at the greatest risk of any state for tidal flooding caused by rising sea levels. And Tampa Bay faces some of the greatest ri...
Published: 06/18/18
Mazzaro’s gets ready to reopen

Mazzaro’s gets ready to reopen

day after an electrical fire broke out in its dry goods warehouse Friday night.Dominic Horwath, a grocery manager at Mazzaro’s on 22nd Ave. N, said staffers spent Monday and the weekend moving things into other warehouses.The damage from the fire at ...
Published: 06/18/18
Mazzaro’s market set to reopen Tuesday after blaze damaged one of its warehouses

Mazzaro’s market set to reopen Tuesday after blaze damaged one of its warehouses

ST. PETERSBURG — Mazzaro’s Italian Market is scheduled to reopen Tuesday after an electrical fire broke out its dry goods warehouse Friday night.Dominic Horwath, a grocery manager at Mazzaro’s on 22nd Avenue N said staff spent Monday and the weekend...
Published: 06/18/18
Developer Grady Pridgen buys St. Pete’s shuttered Edward White Hospital

Developer Grady Pridgen buys St. Pete’s shuttered Edward White Hospital

ST. PETERSBURG — Edward White Hospital, closed four years ago because of declining revenues, has been sold to developer Grady Pridgen for $2.7 million.Pridgen could not be reached Monday for comment. City officials said he has submitted plans for rem...
Published: 06/18/18
Tampa Bay gas prices keep falling

Tampa Bay gas prices keep falling

The summer reprieve in gas prices is continuing.After flirting near the $3 mark, Tampa Bay gas prices fell another six cents a gallon over the past week to an average of $2.65 for unleaded, a wide gap with the national average of $2.91 a gallon, acco...
Published: 06/18/18