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Career Q&A: Third-shift difficulties lead to termination

Q: I'm having trouble explaining why I left my last job. For three years, I worked in a residential treatment facility for youthful offenders. Everything was fine until I was assigned to the third shift, which lasts from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. Adjusting to this schedule was extremely difficult.

Because I could not sleep well during the day, I was always tired at work. I began falling asleep in the middle of my shift, which was obviously unacceptable. Since I was never able to break this pattern, they eventually let me go.

Now, when I apply for a job, I'm not sure how to answer the "reason for leaving" question. If I put "terminated" on the application, I never get an interview. If I tell an interviewer I was fired, I never get called back. I want to be honest, but I also want to be hired. How should I handle this?

A: Since you should never lie during a job search, you will need to be truthful without being self-destructive. For example, when applications request "reason for leaving," you might give an ambiguous answer like "shift difficulties." This is a true statement which can later be explained during an interview.

When talking with potential employers, focus on the physiological challenges of third-shift work. For example: "Although some people have no problem working at night, I could never seem to reverse my sleep patterns. Since I didn't get enough sleep during the day, I kept dozing off during my shift. I was never able to adjust, so unfortunately I had to leave."

Of course, this explanation only works if you are applying for positions with regular daytime hours. But I assume there's no question about that.

Try talking to boss before you quit

Q: My new boss is driving me absolutely crazy. Even though "Ron" knows nothing about the work I do, he arbitrarily shortens my project schedules, then interrogates me about why I'm not working faster. When I try to explain, he ridicules me for goofing off.

Ron's unrealistic expectations are like asking someone to have a baby in four months. I have been with this company for 12 years, and I'm good at my job. But now I'm wondering if I should quit before I get fired.

A: Based on your description, this guy either has no management experience or is not very bright. But despite his shortcomings, you might as well make one more effort to educate him before throwing in the towel.

In a calm, nondefensive manner, try to help Ron see that the two of you are actually on the same side.

For example: "Ron, I understand that we need to accelerate the schedule, and I'm willing to do that. I just want to be sure that we allow enough time for quality checks. If customers start complaining about defective products, you and I will both be in trouble."

If Ron begins to listen, then perhaps there's hope. But if he continues to act like an arrogant tyrant, you may want to start exploring other options.

Check on hiring, but don't be a nuisance

Q: Two weeks ago, my husband sent his resume to a company in another state. Although he is well-qualified for the position, he has not gotten any response. Should he phone the human resources department or would that be viewed as overly aggressive?

A: As a general rule, applicants can appropriately make one call to be sure their resume was received. Similarly, after an interview, they can follow up once to check on the decision process. Beyond that, additional inquiries are likely to brand them as a nuisance.

Unfortunately, time passes much more slowly for job seekers than for those who may hire them.

While applicants are anxiously waiting for news, managers are typically distracted by dozens of other priorities, so your husband may not hear anything for a while. And if he is not selected for an interview, he may never hear anything at all.

Career Q&A: Third-shift difficulties lead to termination 09/13/13 [Last modified: Friday, September 13, 2013 8:53am]
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