Saturday, February 24, 2018
Business

Career Q&A: Working with a dinosaur boss; regretting taking new job

Q: When my boss advised me that I had not made the final round of interviews for a promotion, I couldn't help shedding a few tears. As he was leaving my office, he said, "That's why I don't like working with women." Although I understand why I wasn't promoted, I really resent his insulting comment. What should I do about this?

A: I thought dinosaurs were extinct, but you certainly seem to be working for one. In this day and age, any manager who makes such a blatantly discriminatory statement can't be very bright. Giving direct feedback to someone this clueless would be an exercise in futility.

Instead, consider having a confidential chat with a trustworthy human resources manager. Biased staffing decisions could create legal problems for the company, so this information should cause management to scrutinize your boss' behavior more closely. It might even trigger a review of the promotional process.

Filing a charge with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is another option, but that step should not be taken lightly. Doing so would put you in an adversarial position to management, and your career could suffer as a result. I would like to tell you that legal rights can be exercised without repercussion, but that is often not the case.

If you are planning a future with this company, try to determine whether your boss' prejudices are shared by higher management. Should this attitude seem to be prevalent, you may wish to find an employer whose view of your potential is not clouded by your gender.

New job may be worse than old

Q: I recently changed jobs to escape a long commute, but I'm beginning to think this was a mistake. After working for a week, I have determined that this position involves a lot of data analysis and math, which is definitely not my strong suit.

To make it worse, I came from a very supportive organization where everyone helped each other. This company wants people to be self-starters, so I haven't received much direction. I'm becoming terribly anxious. Do you have any suggestions?

A: Feeling like an instant failure is understandably terrifying, but it's too soon to panic. Even in highly autonomous organizations, managers usually recognize that new hires require an orientation period. Since your learning curve seems particularly steep, strategize with your boss about the best way to get up to speed.

For example: "I've realized that I may need some additional instruction to master the quantitative aspects of my job. Here's a list of the specific areas where training would be helpful. Could we discuss the best way to approach this?"

As your learning progresses, your fear should gradually subside. In the meantime, keep reminding yourself that you were hired for a reason. After meeting you and reviewing your qualifications, your boss obviously felt you had valuable strengths.

On the other hand, if you eventually come to regret this decision, just view it as a valuable lesson learned. The next time an appealing offer comes along, you will undoubtedly remember to carefully investigate the job requirements.

Consequences may get their attention

Q: My employees never remember anything I say. Despite frequent reminders, they continue to ignore standard procedures and well-established rules. When I point out these infractions, they always plead ignorance, even though they've been told many times.

I have tried numerous methods for improving communication, but nothing seems to work. Verbal instructions are promptly forgotten, and written guidelines are always overlooked. We work in health care, so procedures are important. How do I get these people to listen?

A: Your solutions aren't working because you've defined the problem incorrectly. The real issue here is compliance, not communication. These wayward folks continue to ignore you because you have never imposed any consequences for disregarding rules.

Instead of endlessly repeating familiar expectations, you must clearly describe what will happen the next time someone violates a critical procedure. When one of your employees conveniently "forgets," you should immediately impose the promised consequence. If you use this approach consistently, I guarantee that memories will improve.

Comments
Activists call for tech companies to drop NRA’s digital TV channel

Activists call for tech companies to drop NRA’s digital TV channel

Activists are calling for Apple, Amazon, Google and other streaming companies to drop the National Rifle Association’s digital TV channel in the wake of the mass shooting at a Florida school last week, putting the companies in the delicate position o...
Published: 02/24/18
Edward Peachey demands severance from CareerSource before stepping down

Edward Peachey demands severance from CareerSource before stepping down

The head of the Pinellas and Hillsborough career centers under multiple investigations into the way they report job placement figures says he has no intention of stepping down.That’s unless he is paid five months severance.In a letter from his attorn...
Published: 02/23/18
Terminally ill Valrico man dies a month after marrying junior high sweetheart

Terminally ill Valrico man dies a month after marrying junior high sweetheart

VALRICO — During his final few days, 19-year-old Dustin Snyder moved to a hospice house, surrounded himself with belongings from home, swam in a pool and visited the beach in Ruskin.Wherever he went, the terminally ill Valrico man had family beside h...
Published: 02/23/18
Tampa Downtown Partnership gets initial city okay to expand north

Tampa Downtown Partnership gets initial city okay to expand north

TAMPA — The Downtowner may be heading to Tampa Heights — but not until Oct. 1.That’s because the nonprofit Tampa Downtown Partnership this week won initial City Council approval to expand into Tampa Heights."Tampa Heights is becoming an important gat...
Published: 02/23/18

Tampa lawyer gets 27 months in federal prison for insider trading

Tampa lawyer Walter "Chet’’ Little was sentenced this week to 27 months in federal prison for engaging in an insider trading scheme that reaped him and a friend profits totaling nearly $1 million.According to federal authorities, Little accessed comp...
Published: 02/23/18
More companies are cutting ties with gun lobby as #BoycottNRA movement gains steam

More companies are cutting ties with gun lobby as #BoycottNRA movement gains steam

Three major companies — Enterprise Holdings, First National Bank of Omaha, and the cybersecurity giant Symantec — have ended co-branding partnerships with the National Rifle Association as a #BoycottNRA social media movement picks up steam.Enterprise...
Published: 02/23/18
Citi to refund $330 Million to credit card customers it overcharged

Citi to refund $330 Million to credit card customers it overcharged

Citigroup is preparing to issue $330 million in refunds after the bank discovered it had overcharged nearly 2 million credit card customers on their annual interest rates, a spokeswoman said Friday.The bank, which has about 150 million credit card ac...
Published: 02/23/18
Girl Scouts camp sold to member of Tampa’s Lykes family

Girl Scouts camp sold to member of Tampa’s Lykes family

ODESSA — The 63-year-old lakeside summer camp had no air conditioning or electricity. Cabin floors were often covered in grime, and cobwebs clung to the windows.But under new ownership, the 18.6 acres of Florida woods known as Camp Scoutcrest to memb...
Published: 02/23/18
BB&T cites ‘technical issue’ in outage affecting customers

BB&T cites ‘technical issue’ in outage affecting customers

Millions of BB&T customers were unable to access their accounts after a service outage which the bank blames on an equipment malfunction. The Winston-Salem, North Carolina-based bank posted a statement on its Twitter page saying the problem persiste...
Published: 02/23/18
Realtors are ‘every 10 feet’ in Florida but more want in the business

Realtors are ‘every 10 feet’ in Florida but more want in the business

ST. PETERSBURG — Tired of working as a yacht captain, Pancho Jiminez decided to get into real estate even though he knows it’s a highly competitive field in Florida."Realtors are every 10 feet around here," he says.Nonetheless, Jiminez is among 30 st...
Published: 02/23/18