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Come to workplace contagious or use sick days? The boss sets the tone

Are you feeling under the weather? You may cash in sick days when you're coughing and sneezing, but that doesn't mean your phlegmy colleagues stop coming into the office. • A recent telephone survey by research firm International Communications Research found that about 45 percent of employees very frequently show up to work while sick, although managers believe only 17 percent do so. The survey encompassed 2,000 adults and 150 senior executives at the nation's 1,000 largest companies. • Staffing company OfficeTeam, a unit of Robert Half International Inc., offers these tips to help managers avoid allowing ill employees to clock in. Associated Press

Communicate expectations. Let staff know you prefer they stay home when they're sick to ensure a quicker recovery and avoid infecting others.

Set an example. Sick employees are more likely to stay home if you do the same.

Give options. Allowing employees to work from home if they think they're coming down with the flu can help them remain productive without spreading a potential illness around the office.

Offer help. Bring in temporary professionals to keep projects on track when employees are out sick for more than a day or two.

Come to workplace contagious or use sick days? The boss sets the tone 03/09/09 [Last modified: Monday, March 9, 2009 4:16pm]
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