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Eight great jobs for outdoors lovers

Now that summer is here, outdoors lovers may wish they had a job that allowed them to spend less time in a cubicle and more time in nature. If that sounds like you, we've compiled a list of eight jobs for outdoors lovers with the help of the income experts at PayScale.

Ship captain

Whether on a river, lake or out at sea, ship captains get to spend at least part of their day out on deck. They are responsible for a ship's operation, including cargo, navigation, crew management and ensuring the vessel complies with local and international maritime laws. Their median income is $100,473.

Construction safety manager

These leaders get outside while overseeing safety at construction sites and looking out for the well-being of the people who work there. Construction safety managers develop and implement safety education programs and investigate accidents to ensure compliance with safety policies. They have a median income of $67,100.

Wind turbine technician

These fearless climbers spend time outside working on wind turbines. Wind turbine technicians work to identify, inspect, maintain and repair wind turbines in order to keep maintenance costs low and quality high. They have a median income of $57,200.

Geologist

The Earth is the foundation of the outdoors and the business of geologists. They study the Earth, the matter that composes it and the processes that formed it. They may also study natural disasters, climate change and public safety. Their median income is $55,600.

Urban planner

These visionaries spend time outdoors getting to know their city and its inhabitants. Urban planners work to create and evaluate plans, designs and budgets for developing and managing a region and its population's needs. Their work typically includes analyzing environment, infrastructure, transportation, recreation and economic needs. They have a median income of $55,300.

Marine biologist

While geologists are outdoors studying the Earth, marine biologists are out studying the sea. Typically, they are involved in researching the ocean's currents, as well as marine organisms, their behaviors and their interactions with the environment. Their other focuses include rehabilitation, conservation, and education. Their median income is $52,239.

Landscape architect

These artistic plant lovers spend time outdoors combining design and nature to create aesthetic, functional and natural space solutions for public areas, structures and landmarks. Landscape architects work with both natural materials, such as grasses and flowers, and traditional construction materials, such as concrete. They have a median income of $51,534.

Solar energy systems designer

They get outside by working with solar energy systems to provide efficient, sustainable energy solutions for their clients. Solar energy systems designers build and install systems, applying knowledge of energy requirements, local climate conditions and solar technology. They are also responsible for evaluating properties and consulting with clients on the proper placement of systems within code guidelines. They have a median income of $46,159.

© 2013 — Monster Worldwide, Inc. All Rights Reserved. You may not copy, reproduce or distribute this article without the prior written permission of Monster Worldwide. This article first appeared on Monster.com. To see other career-related articles, visit career-advice.monster.com. For recruitment articles, visit hiring.monster.com/hr/hr-best-practices.aspx.

Eight great jobs for outdoors lovers 07/24/13 [Last modified: Friday, August 2, 2013 12:51pm]
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