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Falling layoffs don't mean more jobs

Air Force Master Sgt. Matt Ditarando talks with Walmart store manager Craig Edwards last week at the Hiring Our Heroes job fair at Raymond James Stadium. A Pinellas jobs fair with more than 20 employers is coming up Wednesday

EDMUND D. FOUNTAIN | Times

Air Force Master Sgt. Matt Ditarando talks with Walmart store manager Craig Edwards last week at the Hiring Our Heroes job fair at Raymond James Stadium. A Pinellas jobs fair with more than 20 employers is coming up Wednesday

WASHINGTON — Declining applications for unemployment benefits have typically pointed to stronger hiring.

Not so much anymore.

Since the U.S. recession officially ended in June 2009, fewer layoffs have meant fewer people seeking unemployment aid. On Thursday, for example, the government said first-time applications for benefits fell 30,000 to 339,000, a 4½-year low.

Yet job growth remains sluggish. That was evident last week in the government's jobs report for September. A survey of employers showed that they added a modest 114,000 jobs last month.

And the unemployment rate, based on a separate survey of households, did sink in August to 7.8 percent from 8.1 percent.

If fewer people are being laid off, why aren't employers hiring more?

Blame the slow pace of the U.S. economy, damage from Europe's economic crisis and fear that tax increases and spending cuts could trigger another U.S. recession next year.

Many companies have said they lack confidence that the U.S. economy will strengthen enough in coming months to justify hiring now.

"The relationship between claims and jobs has been less strong during this recovery than in past post-war recoveries," said Drew Matus, an economist at UBS. "There's a hiring problem out there, as opposed to a layoff problem."

A Labor Department spokesman said one large state accounted for much of the drop in applications for unemployment aid last week. The spokesman didn't identify the state, but several economists speculated that it was California.

The long-term trend in applications for unemployment benefits has been steadily dropping, though it has leveled off since spring.

When the economic recovery officially began in June 2009, an average of roughly 600,000 people were filing first-time claims for benefits each week. For nearly a year, that figure has remained consistently below 400,000.

But the decline hasn't correlated with robust job growth, as it did in past economic recoveries. Many economists say they're not ready to predict a strengthening job market.

"We're going to wait for some corroborating data," said Dan Greenhaus, chief market strategist at BTIG LLC.

The 114,000 jobs employers added in September are roughly enough to keep pace with population growth. They aren't enough, though, to provide work for the more than 12 million unemployed Americans.

And most of the job increases last month came from those who had to settle for part-time work: In September, 582,000 more people than in August said they were working part time but wanted full-time jobs.

Jobs fair geared toward veterans

More than 20 employers are expected Wednesday at a veterans career fair in Clearwater hosted by the local workforce board, WorkNet Pinellas. The event will run from noon to 3 p.m. at the EpiCenter at St. Petersburg College, 13805 58th St. N. Although the first hour is dedicated to veterans and military spouses, the jobs fair is open to all job seekers. To register and view a list of participating employers and open positions, go to www.worknetpinellas.org.

U.S. trade deficit expands

The U.S. trade deficit widened in August from July because exports fell to the lowest level in six months. The deficit grew 4.1 percent to $44.2 billion in August, the biggest gap since May, the Commerce Department said Thursday. Exports dropped 1 percent to $181.3 billion. Demand for American-made cars and farm goods declined. Imports edged down a slight 0.1 percent to $225.5 billion.

Falling layoffs don't mean more jobs 10/11/12 [Last modified: Thursday, October 11, 2012 8:03pm]
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