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Five types of employees you don't want to be

Missteps in this digital age can receive broad exposure with unhappy consequences: Three out of four (76 percent) human resources managers polled by staffing firm Robert Half International said technology etiquette breaches can affect a person's career prospects. "Etiquette breaches, such as paying more attention to your smart phone than the people you're meeting with, can make others feel less important and cause you to miss information," said Brett Good, senior district president of Robert Half International. "Other mistakes, such as sending a confidential e-mail to the wrong person or impulsively posting an offensive comment on Facebook or Twitter, can have more serious, career-impacting consequences." To prevent professionals from falling victim to online gaffes, Robert Half identified the top five technology etiquette breachers and gives advice to help workers avoid these labels. PRNewswire

The venter: This indiscreet individual shares job-related gripes and groans across Facebook, Twitter and personal blogs. E-mail, too, takes a negative tone. Advice: Look on the bright side. Keep the information that you post positive. Sticky or unpleasant situations are best discussed offline and in private.

The noise polluter: This person's phone seems to lack a silent mode or an off button. Whether in a meeting or at a colleague's desk, he freely takes and makes calls, oblivious to others. It's impossible to concentrate when he's nearby. Advice: Set your phone to silent mode at the office, and hold personal conversations behind closed doors.

The cryptic communicator: This person relies on texting shorthand for every type of correspondence. Odd or informal abbreviations, poor punctuation and spelling and grammatical goofs leave people shaking their heads. Advice: Slow down, and take it easy on the abbreviations. Spending a little more time on your communications can make them easier to decipher.

The pop-up artist: While you're trying to complete assignments, this chat fanatic sends you a flurry of instant messages. Advice: IMs are fine for quick volleys of conversations, but don't go overboard. And don't expect that everyone will want to "chat" with you. For many, e-mail is immediate enough.

The conference call con: This multitasker pretends to pay attention during teleconferences but is so busy checking e-mail he has no clue what's being discussed. It's not an unusual problem: 45 percent of executives confessed to frequently doing other things while in these meetings, according to another Robert Half survey. Advice: Pay attention. It can help to turn away from your monitor.

Five types of employees you don't want to be 03/03/11 [Last modified: Thursday, March 3, 2011 3:30am]
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