Make us your home page
Instagram
Working | Time management

Get the most out of each day

We're all pressed for time. From working professionals to busy stay-at-home parents, we could all use a few more hours in our day. This is especially true when we're trying to achieve things outside of our daily routine — whether it's starting a business, writing a book, restoring a classic car, training for a marathon or simply pursuing a passionate interest. • Communications adviser and author Rick Mofina offers some tips for people looking for time to write, train or simply pursue a side project outside their chosen profession. StatePoint

• First, set your goal then ask yourself if you are serious about reaching it. What are you willing to give up to achieve that goal? A little less television? How about adjusting your sleep so you can invest a few extra minutes on that goal?

• Consider yourself the CEO of your goal and hire yourself to achieve it. Be disciplined and refuse to make excuses that allow you to fail — things like "I'll do this when I retire" or "when I have more time." Nope: You've just been hired to find the time.

• Start small. Even 30 minutes spent doing something you love will leave you more energized. You'll be rewarded at having gotten closer to the finish line.

• You know better than anyone how much time you waste, or what time you could use more effectively toward applying to your goal. You don't have to follow anyone else's rules. "I write in airports, on airplanes, in hotels," says Mofina. "I write early in the morning. I even write on the bus during my daily commute to my day job."

• Understand that you can't optimize everything — money, love, family, work, health, leisure. We're only human. Celebrities may appear to be, but usually they just have great publicists.

• Dare to be slow. Being a good time manager doesn't mean doing things the fastest, but the most efficiently. Going slow can help you attend to things once, instead of having to go back and correct sloppy mistakes. Slow and steady really does win the race.

Get the most out of each day 07/11/11 [Last modified: Monday, July 11, 2011 11:28pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. 'Toxic' times: How repeal of Florida's tax on services reverberates, 30 years later

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Long before Hurricane Irma attacked Florida, the state faced a troubled fiscal future that the storm will only make worse.

    Robertson says the tax debate is now “toxic.”
  2. Fewer Tampa Bay homeowners are underwater on their mortgages

    Real Estate

    The percentage of Tampa Bay homeowners underwater on their mortgages continues to drop. In the second quarter of this year, 10.2 percent of borrowers had negative equity compared to nearly 15 percent in the same period a year ago, CoreLogic reported Thursday. Nationally, 5.4 percent of all mortgaged homes were …

    The percentage of Tampa Bay homeowners underwater on their mortgages  continues to drop. [Times file photo]
  3. 'What Happened'? Clinton memoir sold 300,000 copies in first week

    Blogs

    Despite being met with decidedly mixed reviews, What Happened, Hillary Clinton's new memoir about the 2016 presidential campaign, sold a whopping 300,000 copies in its first week.

    The new memoir by former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton sold 300,000 copies in its first week.
  4. After Irma topples tree, home sale may be gone with the wind

    Real Estate

    ST. PETERSBURG — To house hunters searching online, the home for sale in St. Petersburg's Shore Acres neighborhood couldn't have looked more appealing — fully renovated and shaded by the leafy canopy of a magnificent ficus benjamini tree.

    Hurricane Irma's winds recently blew over a large ficus tree, left, in the yard of a home at 3601Alabama Ave NE, right, in Shore Acres which is owned by Brett Schroder who is trying to sell the house.
[SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]

  5. Unemployment claims double in Florida after Hurricane Irma

    Business

    The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits dropped by 23,000 last week to 259,000 as the economic impact of Hurricane Harvey began to fade.

    Homes destroyed by Hurricane Irma on Big Pine Key last week. Hurricane Irma continued to have an impact on the job market in Florida, where unemployment claims more than doubled from the previous week.
[The New York Times file photo]